Commercial Economy in Steam and Other Thermal Power-Plants; As Dependent Upon Physical Efficiency, Capital Charges and Working Costs

Commercial Economy in Steam and Other Thermal Power-Plants; As Dependent Upon Physical Efficiency, Capital Charges and Working Costs

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...but in his table Mr. Webber gives $180 per horse-power for this size. He estimates the total of the "fixed charges " as 14 per cent. of the prime total cost. His table and diagram are divided into three sections, for Simple Engines up to 80 H.P.; for Compound Condensing Engines up to 1,000 H.P.; and for Triple Expansion Condensing Engines up to 2,000 H.P. For the smaller sizes increase of price of coal from $2 to $5 per ton, raises the total annual cost by 50 per cent., which ratio again applies to the largest sizes; while at intermediate power this percentage is a little higher. At $5 per ton for coal, the total annual cost per horse-power bears to the total cost of plant a ratio which for simple engines varies, in the direction of increasing size, from TABL...V-, -traight-line Formulae Tor Capital Costs And For Costs Per Year Op 0 0 Working Hours In Of Complete Power Plants In Terms Of Brake Horse-power T. 73 to "55; for compound engines from.50 up to '55 and down again to.50; and for triple-expansion engines from.45 to "39. One Board of Trade Unit of electrical power is one kilowatt hour 1-98 x 106 and equals = 2'654 x 10 ft.-lbs. This measure is 746 mainly used for the electrical output between the terminals of the generating dynamo. An efficiency of 88 per cent. as between this output and the similar output of the driving engine (which is the brake horse-power of this engine), would require exactly 3 million ft.-lbs. work to be done by the engine per B.T.U. If the efficiency were 89J per cent., then exactly 1 engine brake horsepower would yield one kilowatt output from the dynamo. Although the combined mechanical and electrical efficiency of the dynamo is generally lower than this, this relation is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 84 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236647963
  • 9781236647962