Commercial Botany of the Nineteenth Century; A Record of Progress in the Utilisation of Vegetable Products in the United Kingdom, and the Introduction of Economic Plants Into the British Colonies, During the Present Century

Commercial Botany of the Nineteenth Century; A Record of Progress in the Utilisation of Vegetable Products in the United Kingdom, and the Introduction of Economic Plants Into the British Colonies, During the Present Century

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1890 edition. Excerpt: ...Cundurango bark was submitted to numerous experiments, with the result that it was generally pronounced to be of little or no use medicinally in cancer cases. Some interest, however, attaches to it in ccnsequence of its being included amongst the plants used by the natives for the cure of snake-bites, under the name of Guaco. The word Cundurango means "vine of the Condor"--from a tradition of the country that when the condor is bitten by a poisonous snake, it swallows the leaves of this plant and experiences no harm. Mentha arvensis, var. piperascens.--A Chinese herb belonging to the Labiatese. It yields an oil which contains a large quantity of a crystalline substance known as Menthol or Peppermint Camphor. This substance began to attract attention in 1879, since which time Menthol has become an increasing article of trade, and is much used in cases of neuralgia, toothache, etc., by rubbing it on the parts affected. A similar crystalline principle is obtained in India from the oil expressed from the seeds of Carum copticum. The Chinese peppermint plant has been recommended for cultivation in England, and especially in Ireland, where the climate is moist and labour cheap. Myrtus cheken.--kn evergreen climber belonging to the natural order Myrtacese, and native of Chili, where it is known as Chequen, and is in great repute as a medicine in inflammation of the eyes, in diarrhoea, and other disorders, for which purposes it was introduced into this country in 1881. Though the plant has been cultivated in our greenhouses for many years, it flowered for the first time at Kew in 1866. PaulUnia sorbilis.--A. woody climber belonging to the ratural order Sapindacese, and native of the Northern and Western parts of Brazil. The seeds, which are...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236634268
  • 9781236634269