Commerce of the World, and the Share of the U.S. Therein; Letter from the Secretary of State Transmitting the Ann. Rep'ts Upon the Commercial Relations of the U.S. with Foreign Countries for 1880 and 1881

Commerce of the World, and the Share of the U.S. Therein; Letter from the Secretary of State Transmitting the Ann. Rep'ts Upon the Commercial Relations of the U.S. with Foreign Countries for 1880 and 1881

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883 edition. Excerpt: ... pounds, of pure quality, with cans well soldered, are well received in Haytian markets, commanding good prices and having ready sales. Codfish and all sorts of herrings are in constant demand in this country; for, prepared with the vegetables grown here, they make relishing food for the common people. The importation of tobacco has been improving in quantity, if not in quality, latterly. It is a fact that the common qualities of Kentucky have replaced the finer kinds of Virginia tobacco. A cheap article seems to be desired. From Louisville very strong brown grades of tobacco are imported, which seem to be enjoyed. The brown is used in the pipe and for chewing, while the brighter sorts are employed in making what is called the American cigar, which is used very generally, replacing almost entirely all other kinds. American soap, an article manufactured at New York, is imported into this country and used iu the largest quantities. No soap known here is valued as this for ordinary purposes. The Haytian washerwoman shows her appreciation of it by using it in preference to all other. With respect to the cotton goods of the United States imported into this country-during the year, it is not possible to report, generally, such considerable improvement as might be desirable. And yet there have been some importations of this class of goods. A prominent mercantile house of Port-au-Prince reports the importation of 10,000 pieces of denims of 25 yards each, making 250,000 yards; 4,000 pieces of calico, of 25 yards each, making 10,000 yards; and 5,000 pieces of prints, of 25 vards each, making 125,000 yards. The most prominent business house in this city states that it has imported this year and sold at reasonable figures between six anil eight hundred...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 122 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 231g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236530551
  • 9781236530554