Commerce of the Prairies, Or, the Journal of a Santa Fe Trader; During Eight Expeditions Across the Great Western Prairies, and a Residence of Nearly

Commerce of the Prairies, Or, the Journal of a Santa Fe Trader; During Eight Expeditions Across the Great Western Prairies, and a Residence of Nearly

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1844 edition. Excerpt: ...Santa Fe trade has been of but little importance to the government of Mexico. Though the amount of duties collected annually at this port has usually been fifty to eighty thousand dollars, yet nearly one-half has been embezzled by the officers of the customs, leaving an average net revenue of perhaps less than forty thousand dollars per annum. It is not an unimportant fact to be known, that, since the year 1831, few or none of the difficulties and dangers which once environed the SantaFe adventurer have been encountered. No traders have been killed by the 166 RECENT INCIDENTS. savages on the regular route, and but few animals stolen from the caravans. On the whole, the rates of insurance upon adventures in this trade should hardly be as high as upon marine adventures between New York and Liverpool. While I declare, however, the serious dangers and troubles to have been in general so slight, I ought not to suppress at least an outline of the difficulties that occurred on the Prairies in 1843, which were attended with very serious consequences. It had been reported in Santa Fe as early as November, 1842, that a party of Texans were upon the Prairies, prepared to attack any Mexican traders who should cross the Plains the succeeding spring; and as some Americans were accused of being spies, and in collusion with the Texans, many were ordered to Santa Fe for examination, occasioning a deal of trouble to several innocent persons. Than this, however, but little further attention was paid to the report, many believing it but another of those rumors of Texan invasion which had so often spread useless consternation through the country. So little apprehension appeared to exist, that, in February, 1843, Don Antonio Jose Chavez, of New Mexico, left Santa Fe...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236667492
  • 9781236667496