Combustion of Coal and the Prevention of Smoke; A Practical Treatise for Engineers, Firemen and All Others Interested in Fuel Economy and the Suppression of Smoke from Stationary Steam-Boiler Furnaces, and from Locomotives; Contains

Combustion of Coal and the Prevention of Smoke; A Practical Treatise for Engineers, Firemen and All Others Interested in Fuel Economy and the Suppression of Smoke from Stationary Steam-Boiler Furnaces, and from Locomotives; Contains

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...subjected to the influence of heat, its temperature will rise progressively for each increment of heat received, until the temperature of the ice reaches 32 F., when the melting of the ice will begin. It will also' be observed that, continuing the application of the heat to the ice, as before, there is no corresponding rise in temperature either in the ice or in the water in contact with the ice so long as any of the latter remains unmelted; and that during the process of melting the temperature of the water is constant, and at 32 F. This change of state from solid to liquid, in the melting of one pound of ice, requires 143 units of heat, the temperature being constant at 32 F. The heat does not raise the temperature of the ice, but disappears in causing its condition to change from the solid to the liquid state. This is called the latent heat of fusion. Q. What is oule's equivalent? The exact mechanical equivalent of heat was first demonstrated experimentally by Dr. Joule, of Manchester, Eng PADDLE land, the apparatus employed by him being represented in Fig. 13. A known weight was connected by means of cords to a shaft f, mounted on friction wheels not shown in the illustration. On this shaft a pulley was secured, which through the medium of another cord imparted motion to the shaft r, and caused it to revolve. At the lower end of this shaft r were fitted eight sets of paddles, which, when connected by means of a pin P, revolved with it. To the interior of the copper vessel B were attached four stationary vanes, cut out in such manner as to permit the free revolution of the revolving paddles. Precautions were taken to prevent a transfer of heat from the vessel B, which need not be described here. This vessel was filled with...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 76 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236778502
  • 9781236778505