The Columbian Institute for the Promotion of Arts and Sciences; A Washington Society of 1816-1838, Which Established a Museum and Botanic Garden Under Government Patronage

The Columbian Institute for the Promotion of Arts and Sciences; A Washington Society of 1816-1838, Which Established a Museum and Botanic Garden Under Government Patronage

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...for the university,1 and added: Conceiving (if there be space sufficient to afford it) that a botanical garden would be a good appendage to the institution of a university, part of this square might be applied to that purpose. If inadequate, and the square, designated in the plan of Major L'Enfant for a Marine Hospital, is susceptible of that institution and a botanical garden also, ground there might be appropriated to this use. If neither will admit of it, I see no solid objection against commencing this work within the President's Square, it being previously understood that it is not to be occupied for this purpose beyond a certain period; or until circumstances would enable or induce the public to improve it into pleasure walks. The establishment of a botanical garden at the National Capital was also not infrequently the subject of communications by various writers, printed in the public press and elsewhere, in which the importance of such an institution both to the science and application of botany was discussed. In the opinion of a contributor to the National Magazine for December 1, 1801, Perhaps nothing would tend more to benefit this city and the Nation at large than that the seat of the general government should be the depository of the arts and sciences. With this impression, I have sometimes speculated on fanciful improvements, and imagined the President's house converted into a National Museum, where, as in Paris and London, a National Institute might be established and lectures read. Such speculations, however glad I might be to see realized, are attended with difficulties, which do not obstruct the following lands being appropriated for public use, which are well calculated for the purpose. I cannot help recommending it to all...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236488717
  • 9781236488718