Colonial Administration, 1800-1900; Methods of Government and Development Adopted by the Principal Colonizing Nations in Their Control of Tropical and Other Colonies and Dependencies. with Statistical Statements of the Area, Population,

Colonial Administration, 1800-1900; Methods of Government and Development Adopted by the Principal Colonizing Nations in Their Control of Tropical and Other Colonies and Dependencies. with Statistical Statements of the Area, Population,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...Moreover, the Government has recognized the obligation of protecting the natives in their dealings with the more intelligent and the less scrupulous white persons. Considerations of public safety as well as the interests of the natives have led to the prohibition or regulation of the sale of intoxicating liquors or of firearms to the natives. Particular rules are provided for the determination of contracts of sale, debt, pledge, etc., when a native is the party bound by the contract. Contracts for the employment of natives and for their transportation out of the colony are subject to governmental approval, and the latter are generally forbidden. Slave trading is prohibited. Slavery and polygamy are tolerated where the Government has undertaken to respect the customs of the natives, but the tendency is to eliminate both of these institutions. METHODS OF RAISING REVENUE. "As previously indicated, the determination of the revenue so far as it arises from colonial sources, excluding loans, is within the control of the Emperor. It is, of course, possible for the imperal legislature to establish in the colonial budget a different income from that estimated, but this would take the form of the determination of a lump sum rather than the establishment or modification of a particular source of income. So long as the executive has the general power of colonial taxation, it is improbable that the legislature will undertake to determine the character or amount of the income. "The inhabitants of the colony have no voice in the determination of the source or amount of the revenue. The governor determines such matters, subject to the power of the home authorities to overrule or modify his acts. "No disposition is manifested to accord the citizens...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 424 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 22mm | 753g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236573900
  • 9781236573902