Colon Fire Claims; Message from the President of the United States Transmitting a Communication from the Secretary of State with Accompanying Papers, Being "Copies of All the Correspondence Between the Department of State and the

Colon Fire Claims; Message from the President of the United States Transmitting a Communication from the Secretary of State with Accompanying Papers, Being "Copies of All the Correspondence Between the Department of State and the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...to the General Government, but the power was unsubstantial and illusory, for the dominion exercised b the States enabled them to emasculate, if not utterly destroy, its efficiency and to efeat the performance of any engagement entered into under its authority. Such, indeed, were the methods of administration under that constitution that the form of overnment at the time was an anomaly in the histo of nations and was well descn ed b a late minister to this legation as "an organiz anarchy." (Mr. King to Mr. Bayar, N0. 81, Oct. 22, 1886, For. Rel. 1886, 176, 177.) The sovereign State of Panama, after a period of repression, lasting from 1886 to 1903, has now resumed its sovereignty and become the independent Republic of Panama. The reasons why it is, in that character, rimarily liable for the payment of the claims of citizens of the nited States growing out of the burning of Colon have been duly set forth, but it may be convenient to sum them up in a concise form. The claims in question are to be considered as an unliquidated debt, for which, at the time when they arose, the Government of Colombia was rimarily liable. Had the liability been of an ordinary character, an in no wise derived from a treaty stipulation local in its a plioation, then the State of Panama, as a constitutent part of the olombian confederation, would have been presumptively liable for its proportionate share of the debt. But, in consequence of the local nature of the obligation out of which the liability for the payment of the claims arises, there can be no doubt that if Colombia had been required by the United States to pay the Colon claims, the Government of Colombia would, so far as possible, have paid them out of the revenues distinctivel derived from...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 56 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 118g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236848837
  • 9781236848833