Colombia and World War I

Colombia and World War I : The Experience of a Neutral Latin American Nation During the Great War and its Aftermath, 1914-1921

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Description

This book offers an overview of the foreign and domestic policies of the administrations of Jose Vicente Concha (1914-1918) and Marco Fidel Suarez (1918-1923). It reveals that despite Colombia's neutrality, World War I had a significant impact on the economic and political development of the country during the first half of an era often referred to as the Conservative Republic.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 152 pages
  • 158 x 236 x 22mm | 320g
  • Lexington Books
  • Lanham, MD, United States
  • English
  • 6 black & white illustrations, 3 maps
  • 0739187732
  • 9780739187739
  • 2,093,300

Review quote

Jane Rausch's study of Colombia, a somewhat precariously neutral Latin American country, is an important contribution to [the study of World War I] ... Rausch is an acknowledged authority on Colombia and the frontier regions of the capitalist era around Latin America...This study shows in new detail the Colombian elite's perspective on the process by which the United States took the opportunity of wartime conditions across the Atlantic...Rausch's account is fluently written, and it includes several apt cartoons from the war years. It adds an important national dimension to the growing literature on Latin America in those years in the setting of global events. Hispanic American Historical Review Jane Rausch has been systematically studying the history of Colombia for fifty years. In this remarkable new book, the author juxtaposes Colombian neutrality during the 'Great War' (1914) with a dramatic domestic/international polemic: ratification of the Thomson-Urrutia Treaty (1921) in the United States. For Rausch, ratification represented a steady but uneven movement into twentieth-century modernity for the South American nation. -- Michael J. LaRosa, Rhodes College Professor Rausch's important new volume explores the myriad economic, political, and diplomatic effects of World War I on Colombia, one of seven Latin American nations that maintained strict neutrality while the Great War raged in Europe. A period long neglected by historians, Rausch hopes that her book will encourage comparative scholarly research on other Latin American nations during the same time frame (1914-21). Her findings illuminate both the stark and subtle challenges Colombians faced during a period of great global and hemispheric change. -- Michael Edward Stanfield, University of San Francisco Once it was thought that Colombia had passed World War I by. Now Jane Rausch has shown that the European conflict had a daily impact on Colombia, thrusting its civilian and elected leaders into agonizing balancing acts, between falling European markets, fiscal crises, a growing relationship with the United States, which many could not quite trust, foreign investors, and political protests, all embittering their political disputes. Yet, the story told here is the resilience of Colombia's institutions and leaders during those difficult years. -- Herbert Tico Braun, University of Virginiashow more

About Jane M. Rausch

Jane M. Rausch is professor emerita of history at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and is the author or editor of nine books. She has also been a contributing editor for the Handbook of Latin American Studies since 1985.show more

Table of contents

Preface Chapter 1: Colombia in 1914 Chapter 2: Europe in Flames: The Concha Administration and the Outbreak of World War I:August 1914-August 1915 Chapter 3: Staying the Course: Diplomatic and Economic Developments: August 1915-April 1917 Chapter 4: New Challenges: U.S. Declaration of War on Germany and the Controversial Accession of Suarez to the Presidency: April 1917-November 1918 Chapter 5: Collateral Damage: The Aftermath of the War: November 1918-November 1921 Conclusion Annex 1: Statement of "The Rights and Duties of Neutral Powers and Persons in Case of War On Land," adopted by the Hague Convention, 1907 Annex 2: Thomson-Urrutia Treat, 1914show more