The Collegian's Guide or Recollections of College Days Setting Forth the Advantages and Temptations of a University Education

The Collegian's Guide or Recollections of College Days Setting Forth the Advantages and Temptations of a University Education

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ...small, though perhaps a very small part, of some of the most honourable examinations, preparations have been made in a manner not much less intellectual than this ridiculous trick of these medical students. The only thing to be said in excuse of it is this: that when the reward of years of severe study depends on so capricious a test as some twenty questions in each subject, students will naturally modify their studies a little to fit the examination: the error perhaps is chiefly in carrying this adaptation too far. " Having thus described the nature of cramming, and introduced Belton and Lipsley as gentlemen who availed themselves of this remedy for stunted faculties and loss of time, and having also mentioned Allen as one who studied consistently for his examination, as well as John Minton, who to this day deeply rues his idleness, in taking his name off, when the infallible Mr. Tufton said he might get through--it is now time to pursue the fortunes of this reading party. Afterwards, by the way of contrast, we will indulge the reader with a peep at Mr. Whitbread, who was ready for, and finally attained, a place in the First Class. " Belton, Lipsley, and Allen, spent no small part of the day in each other's rooms. Belton and Lipsley were joined together not only by the same apprehensions of the same coming event, which cast ALLEN'S SOCIETY COURTED. 237 a very dark shadow before it, but also by a joint interest in the comfort and assistance they derived from Allen. Neither could endure that the other should enjoy a monopoly of his services. No sooner had Allen sat down to ' give a construe' to Belton, or to ' put him up to a wrinkle' in logic, than he would find Lipsley just dropping in to ask what was to be got up instead of one...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 120 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236507738
  • 9781236507730