Collected Studies on the Pathology of War Gas Poisoning; From the Department of Pathology and Bacteriology Medical Science Section, Chemical Warfare Service

Collected Studies on the Pathology of War Gas Poisoning; From the Department of Pathology and Bacteriology Medical Science Section, Chemical Warfare Service

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...are neither large nor numerous (as in phosgene cases). In such patches there is crepitation, but practically everywhere else the lung is doughy and airless (Fig. 1). On section, clear fluid and blood pour out like water from a squeezed sponge. The tissue is red and semi-translucent with occasional lighter, air-containing patches. Near the margins of the upper lobes, there are a few small emphysematous areas. The bronchi, like the lung proper, are full of fluid, and in the large branches, there is some froth. The mucosa is somewhat reddened, and that of the smallest branches is rather opaque. About each there is a zone of edema, which is also conspicuous about the larger blood vessels. The trachea is full of sticky froth. Its mucosa is slightly reddened but is otherwise normal. The remaining organs, --liver, spleen, kidneys, adrenals, gastrointestinal tract, brain, --are negative. Microscopic Findings: There is little worthy of note aside from the respiratory tract. The tracheal epithelium is practically everywhere intact, but in places the superficial cells are somewhat shrunken and distorted and have lost their cilia; a few are desquamated. In the largest bronchi a similar condition is seen, but as one passes downward into the mediumsized cartilage-containing tubes, the injury is far more serious. The superficial cells are quite necrotic, and the entire layer is partially loosened from the wall (Fig. 5). In the bronchioles and atria, there is not only death of the living cells but necrosis of the wall itself (Fig. 6). The lung tissue shows practically everywhere a complete filling of the alveoli with coagulated edematous fluid, which is quite rich in albumin (Figs. 3 and 5). A few air bubbles are seen, but these are more prominent in the.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 56 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 118g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236967194
  • 9781236967190