Coleridge and Textual Instability
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Coleridge and Textual Instability : The Multiple Versions of the Major Poems

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Stillinger establishes and documents the existence of numerous different authoritative versions of Coleridge's best-known poems: sixteen or more of The Eolian Harp, for example, eighteen of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, and comparable numbers for This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison, Frost at Midnight, Kubla Khan, Christabel, and Dejection: an Ode. Such multiplicity of versions raises a number of theoretical and practical questions about the constitution of the Coleridge canon, the ontological identity of any specific work in the canon, the editorial treatment of Coleridge's works, and the ways in which multiple versions complicate interpretation of the poems as a unified (or, as the case may be, disunified) body of work. Providing much new information about the texts and production of Coleridge's major poems, Stillinger's study offers intriguing new theories about the nature of authorship and the constitution of literary works.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 268 pages
  • 162.6 x 234.7 x 24.6mm | 676.8g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • 2 line drawings
  • 0195085833
  • 9780195085839

Back cover copy

Textual pluralism holds that there can exist more than one authoritative version of a literary work, and that only by viewing the collective versions can the constitution of a work be seen. In Coleridge and Textual Instability, Jack Stillinger establishes and documents the existence of numerous different authoritative versions of Coleridge's best-known poems: sixteen or more of The Eolian Harp, for example, eighteen of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, and comparable numbers for This Lime-Tree Bower, Frost at Midnight, Kubla Khan, Christabel, and Dejection: An Ode. Such multiplicity of versions raises interesting theoretical and practical questions about the make-up of the Coleridge canon, the ontological identity of any specific work in the canon, the editorial treatment of Coleridge's works, and the ways in which multiple versions complicate interpretation of the poems as a unified (or, as the case may be, disunified) body of work. Providing much new information about the texts and production of Coleridge's major poems, Stillinger's study offers intriguing new theories about the nature of authorship and the composition of literary works.show more

Review quote

...this book gives us a convenient early chance to reconsider the nature and significance of textual variety in Coleridge's work. * Times Literary Supplement *show more

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