The Coinages of Western Europe; From the Fall of the Western Empire Under Honorius to Its Reconstruction Under Charles the Great

The Coinages of Western Europe; From the Fall of the Western Empire Under Honorius to Its Reconstruction Under Charles the Great

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 edition. Excerpt: ...who ruled over a colony of German settlers (whom, moreover, he was anxious to please), unlike his brother Emperors coined a certain number (I am inclined to say a considerable number) of pure silver coins; that two types from among these pieces apparently inspired the first coinage which, in after years, these same colonists attempted, and that many others of his types are adequately represented upon their coins. If, however, the theory of Saxon settlement be not 80 The Romans used the heavier denarii of the Republic and early Empire till they were so worn as to be almost indistinguishable. This was made an excuse by Nerva and his successors for striking the well-known " restorations " of earlier coins. Mommsen, bk. iii. ch. ii. (Mommsen speaks of Trajan as the first restorer of the old types. One of Nerva is, however, in the British Museum.) In the " Mon. Hist. Brit.," from which Cohen took his descriptions of the coins of Carausius, 44 silver and less than 300 copper coins are engraved. In the find of Carausius coins at Rouen, out of 180 coins 3 only were denarii. adapted as a locus standi, we may still gain from our numismatic inquiry no inconsiderable addition of evidence for its support. Our examination of the various codes among the continental Teutonic nations led to the conclusion that among all those German people who had remained near the borders of the old Roman Empire, and had not shared in the movement which hurried their brother nations far from their early homes into France, and Spain, and Africa, and Italy, that all these had preserved unbroken the tradition of a silver currency. Tacitus, in the first century, noticed the preference of the German people for old and wellknown types of Roman silver coins;...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236982185
  • 9781236982186