Coillard of the Zambesi, the Lives of Francois and Christina Coillard, of the Paris Missionary Society, in South and Central Africa (1858-1904); With a Frontispiece, a Map, and 77 Illustrations

Coillard of the Zambesi, the Lives of Francois and Christina Coillard, of the Paris Missionary Society, in South and Central Africa (1858-1904); With a Frontispiece, a Map, and 77 Illustrations

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ...emergency. Their direction at one juncture lying through a pathless forest, " we had a new consultation with the Boer hunter and our principal men. Christina took part in it. She has a power of judgment worth ten men." When all were exhausted, after dragging the waggon through a dry river-bed, she it was who produced bottle after bottle of cold tea, a provision she had made at the last good fountain. " Oh! " cried the poor men crowding round her, " you are our mother; you save our lives." Again, she is seen cutting out garments for the catechists' wives to sew, tending their sick children, and the whole time carrying on her niece's education as quietly and almost as thoroughly as if in a Parisian schoolroom; classifying plants and writing copious journals; or surrounded by painted savages armed to the teeth, watching to steal everything they could lay hands upon, and bargaining with her for the food they brought. This was a weary duty, for it was necessary to husband the slender resources the Basuto Churches had provided out of their poverty (as compared with Europeans), and the catechists did not like that at all. When the Banyai said, " See how destitute we are; you have a whole waggon full of goods, and you grudge us a few beads," the Basutos wanted to figure as benefactors and shower upon them whatever they asked, so as to win the way to their hearts. It required no little generalship to keep every one up to the mark, especially with so many women and children. From the first M. and Mme. Coillard had decided that to avoid expense and misunderstanding, they and their servants would fare alike with the catechists and their families, instead of having separate cooking. Needless...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 136 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 254g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236789229
  • 9781236789228