Coillard of the Zambesi; The Lives of Francois and Christina Coillard, of the Paris Missionary Society, in South and Central Africa (1858-1904)

Coillard of the Zambesi; The Lives of Francois and Christina Coillard, of the Paris Missionary Society, in South and Central Africa (1858-1904)

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ... chiefs, who each dwelt sepfl-r3t@ on his mountain, at the mercy of the' Matabele. These mountains were formed of colossal crags, the soft, sandy soil in which they were originally embedded having been gradually washed away by the rains, leaving huge interstices. Consequently every citadel was a miniature Gibraltar, full of secret passages and hidden rockchambers, in which the poor people took refuge with 187 7 THE BANYAI 239 their cattle from their enemies. They were a slavish and cowardly crew. Instead of uniting forces and boldly repelling the Matabele, they preferred each to keep his independence, hiding in these eyries when attacked, whence they maintained a futile defensive warfare.' They had old guns that had passed from hand to hand all over Africa till they were useless; they contrived to make their own powder, which was highly explosive, but had no propelling power, partly because, having no lead, they made bullets of iron. The Matabele, before whom they grovelled, raided them pitilessly. The Banyai had not even the courage and skill to hunt game, but dug pits for the antelopes, covered by a few branches, into which they fell and were transfixed on spiked stakes at the bottom. The party narrowly missed falling into one of these. When once they discovered they need not fear violence from the caravan, their one idea was to make all they could out of it and give nothing in exchange. The first of the chiefs who had invited them into the country and promised them hospitality was Masonda, whose place they reached on August 31, 1877. It was a long and narrow valley closed in by rocky, wooded hills, not far from the Zimbabwe ruins, a perfect paradise of beauty, and densely peopled. The moment the waggon entered it, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 130 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 245g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123697591X
  • 9781236975911