COBOL Programming Using the .NET Framework

COBOL Programming Using the .NET Framework

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There is more code written in COBOL than in any other programming language. Now that COBOL.net will be integrated into Visual Studio.NET IDE. Therefore, for the first time there will be language interoperability between COBOL and other .NET languages. Web applications can be built using ASP.NET and WebForms. Another important aspect is the migration path for legacy COBOL systems to Windows. COBOL.NET will be able to use the advanced .NET concepts, e.g. remoting, security etc. COBOL.NET will use the SOAP, XML, and CLI (Common Language Interface) standards to accomplish its mission in the distributed computing environment. This will be one of the few books available on the market that covers COBOL.NET.-- Covers design, implementation, and distribution new COBOL.NET applications-- Covers how to migrate legacy code into the Windows 2000 .NET Framework environment-- Covers SOAP, XML, and CLI (Common Language Interface) standards-- Reviews on the OO COBOL programming (using .NET extensions) language and its interoperabilityCOBOL is common business oriented language. Developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s, COBOL is the second-oldest highlevel programming language (FORTRAN is the oldest). It is particularly popular for business applications that run on large computers. COBOL is a wordy language; programs written in COBOL tend to be much longer than the same programs written in other languages. COBOL.NET will be integrated into Visual Studio.NET IDE. Therefore, for the first time we will have language interoperability between COBOL and other .NET languages. COBOL will have full use of the powerful and semantically rich .NET Base Class Libraries. For the first time COBOLcan be used to build Win32 rich client interfaces using WinForms. Web applications using ASP.NET and WebForms can be built. It also gives a migration path for legacy COBOL system to Windows. Another important aspect is COBOL.NET is an object-oriented language just like C++ and C#. COBOL.NET will be able to use the advanced .NET concepts, e.g. remoting, security... . COBOL.NET will use the SOAP, XML, and CLI (Common Language Interface) standards to accomplish its mission in the distributed computing environment. Although disparaged by many programmers for being outdated, COBOL is still the most widely used programming language in the world.This book covers COBOL programming using .NET framework and how to design, implement, and distribute new COBOL.NET applications. It also covers how to migrate legacy code into the Windows 2000 .NET Framework environment.This book is targeted at experienced COBOL programmers interested in programming for the .NET platform as well as other programmers interested in COBOL.The CD-ROM includes the source code from the book as well as example programs on the material covered in the book.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 336 pages
  • 177.5 x 235.2 x 24.1mm | 625.97g
  • Prentice Hall
  • Upper Saddle River, United States
  • English
  • w. figs.
  • 0130668435
  • 9780130668431

Table of contents

Preface. Acknowledgments. 1. Review and Introduction to Object-Oriented COBOL Programming Using the .NET Framework. Componentware, Cognition, and Software Development. Object and Cognitive Activities. What Is an Object? What Is a Software Object? Object-Oriented Programming with COBOL. COBOL Classes and Language Interoperability. COBOL Classes and the .NET Base Classes.2.NET Framework. Introduction. .NET Framework Base Classes. Common Language Runtime. Metadata and Self-Describing Components.3. Graphical User Interface Applications Using Windows Forms. Introduction to Windows Forms. What Is a Form? Windows Forms and Web Forms Considerations. Windows Forms Controls. Building a Windows Forms Project. Adding Control to Forms. Adding Menu Items and Pull-Downs to Windows Forms.4. Web Applications Using ASP.NET and Web Forms. Introduction. Looping Hello World Program. Fruit List Program. Fibonacci Program. ASP.NET Code Generation Program. Simple Control Program. Hi You Selected Program.5. .NET COBOL Web Services. Introduction. Web Service Generic Architecture. .NET Enterprise Servers. Moving Forward with .NET Framework. Web Service Demo Programs. Area Code Service COBOL Source Code. Advantages of Converting COBOL to Web Services.6. Building Database Applications Using ADO.NET. Introduction. ADO.NET Architecture. ADO.NET DataSet. ADO.NET DataTable. ADO.NET DataColumn. ADO.NET DataRow. ADO.NET DataRelation. ADO.NET ForeignKeyConstraint. ADO.NET UniqueConstraint. Sample ADO COBOL Program.7. Migration of COBOL Legacy Systems to .NET Framework. COBOL and Web Services. What Is SOAP and What Does It Have to Do with Web Services? How Can Users Build COBOL Web Services Using the SOAP Toolkit? Can Users Build Web Service Clients in Fujitsu COBOL? COM Modules. Microsoft Visual Basic Client. The SOAP Toolkit. Client Updates. .NET.8. Introduction to Windows 2000. Windows 2000 Operating System Architecture. Processes, Threads, and Jobs in Windows 2000.Appendix A: Programming Techniques. APIs Used with Windows 2000 Processes. Base Priority for Windows 2000. .NET Framework Namespaces. General Rules of the Language. Program Structure.Appendix B: Windows Forms. System.Window.Forms Namespace. Controls You Can Use on Windows Forms.Appendix C: Web Namespaces. System.Web Namespace. System.Web.UI Namespace. System.Web.UI.HtmlControls Namespace. System.Web.UI.WebControls Namespace. System.Web.Services Namespace.Appendix D: Data Namespaces. System.Data Namespace. System.Xml Namespace. System.Data.OleDb Namespace. System.Data.SqlClient Namespace.Index.
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About Ronald D. Reeves

RONALD D. REEVES, PH.D., is President of Computer Engineering, Inc., a leading consulting and training company based in Howell, MI. He is author of C++/C# Programmer's Guide for Windows 2000 and co-author of Win32 System Services: The Heart of Windows 98 and Windows 2000, Third Edition (both from Prentice Hall PTR).
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