Cobbett's Parliamentary History of England; From the Norman Conquest, in 1066 to the Year 1803. Comprising the Period from the Third Day of December 1798, to the Twenty-First Day of March, 1800 Volume N . 34

Cobbett's Parliamentary History of England; From the Norman Conquest, in 1066 to the Year 1803. Comprising the Period from the Third Day of December 1798, to the Twenty-First Day of March, 1800 Volume N . 34

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1819 edition. Excerpt: ...I should wish to speak on this occasion, not merely with respect, but, I must say, with gratitude ai. J reverence, of the conduct held by that which we must call the Irish nation, and which is, indeed, entitled to that appellation--I mean the Irish government, the Irish parliament, a great portion of the property of Ireland, of its gentry, and even of its people. In these we have witnessed exertions of courage, activity, perseverance, and spirit, as well as of fidelity and honour, in fulfilling the engagements of their connexion with us, and in the protection and defence of their own country, which challenge the thanks of Great Britain and the approbation of the world. But this sentiment cannot either conceal from us, or disguise other truths, not less obvious, though less grateful and welcome. The loyalty, the prudence, and spirit, which we commend, on one hand, do not, however, prevent an extensive and desperate conspiracy, on the other, against the common safety of Great Britain and Ireland, and aiming above all, avowedly and distinctly against that connexion, in which the safety of both is felt to reside. After I hearing his majesty's lawful exercise of the powers with which the constitution of Ireland has invested him, and the legiti-' mate means employed by the sovereign of that country to preserve a uniformity of I measures in the direction of our common interests, treated as the interference of a foreign power, we have the misfortune of j seeing at this hour a great portion of the Irish people, considerable for its numbers, and, I fear, not altogether contemptible, even for its blood and talents, in open rebellion against our common sovereign, and in close alliance with our common enemy. The dissolution of all connexion between us is the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 618 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 32mm | 1,089g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236644867
  • 9781236644862