Cobbett's Legacy to Labourers, Or, What Is the Right Which the Lords, Baronets and Squires Have to the Lands of England?; In Six Letters Addressed to the Working People of England, with a Dedication to Sir Robert Peel, Bart

Cobbett's Legacy to Labourers, Or, What Is the Right Which the Lords, Baronets and Squires Have to the Lands of England?; In Six Letters Addressed to the Working People of England, with a Dedication to Sir Robert Peel, Bart

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1835 edition. Excerpt: ...possess. No one denies that you have a full right to the use of your lands and premises; but reason says, and justice says, that you have no right to avail yourself of that use to do injury to another man. The first of all rights is the right of life and limb. I have a right to the use of my hands; but I have not a right to apply that use to any purpose that I please; and yet I have as much right to knock you down with my fists, as you have to send forth from your premises smokes or smells which must naturally drive me out of my house. The above are restraints upon a man for the good or security of his neighbours, or of a comparatively small part of the community. But, there are other cases demanding a similar restraint for the good of the whole community. Suppose a river or stream to have its spring in your land, to run for a distance through it, then to pass through other lands. Now observe, water, air, light, are things always possessed in common. They cannot, except in particular cases, be appropriated, or become the property of any man. The spring, the bed of it, and the land around it, are yours. The stream is yours, to use, at your pleasure, as far as it runs upon your land: but, you must not destroy the spring, if you can; you must not prevent the stream from going on, and entering your neighbour's land at the usual place; for there it begins to be his, as completely as the spring and the former part of the stream are yours. Besides this, you must not do anything to the water, even on your own premises, that shall change its colour or its quality in any respect. If-you were to apply the stream to any purpose that would cause the water to kill cattle by the drinking of it, the law would compel you to pay the full amount of the damage thus...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236659937
  • 9781236659934