Clays in Several Parts of Kentucky; With Some Account of Sands, Marls and Limestones. 1. Kaolins and Plastic Clays on the Eastern Rim of the Western Coalfield; Notes on Clays in the Western, Lead, Zinc and Spar District (F.J. Fohs); Clays

Clays in Several Parts of Kentucky; With Some Account of Sands, Marls and Limestones. 1. Kaolins and Plastic Clays on the Eastern Rim of the Western Coalfield; Notes on Clays in the Western, Lead, Zinc and Spar District (F.J. Fohs); Clays

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...6m. 2. Gravel (Lafayette)......;............................... 5ft. 3. Dark, pyrltous clay..................................... 2ft... The upper two feet of the deposit (No. 3 of the section) are exposed for several hundred yards along the branch. The exposure is in timbered lands and a luxuriant plant growth is found above the bed.. Following are analyses of the refractory black clays, No. 2641, etc., noted in the preceding descriptions: A number of our Kentucky clays compare favorably in their analytical results with the German glass-pot clays, which are so celebrated for their great refractory character. As will be seen in the table given below, the percentages of iron and potash, the injurious ingredients, are oomparatively little above those of the German clays, and in several instances one or the other is much less; while in the Calloway county clay, No. 2639, there is only a trace of iron, a small amount of potash. and very large percentages of silica and alumina, making this a far purer clay than the German; in fact almost a kaolinite or hydrous silicate of alumina, a mineral with the composition of silica 46.3, alumina 39.8, and water 13.9 per cent. There is but little doubt that these clays can take the place of the'German clays in those establishments where they would be required to withstand the most intense heat. They are at least worth the trial. Transportation facilities alone are in favor of the German clays, which are brought over as ballast in vessels, and, therefore, at a very low cost to those who use them. The German fireclays are supposed to be the most refractory clays known, and are imported for the construction of crucibles to withstand a very high heat, but particularly for our glass manufacturers, who seem to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 80 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 159g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123692262X
  • 9781236922625