A Classical Dictionary; Containing Proper Names Mentioned in Ancient Authors, and Intended to Elucidate Points Connected with the Geography, History, Biography, Mythology and Fine Arts of the Greeks and Romans an Account of Volume 2

A Classical Dictionary; Containing Proper Names Mentioned in Ancient Authors, and Intended to Elucidate Points Connected with the Geography, History, Biography, Mythology and Fine Arts of the Greeks and Romans an Account of Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1841 edition. Excerpt: ...writers, and those most worthy of the epithet of classic, that flourished after the age of Augustus.--In his religious principles, Pliny was almost an atheist, or, at least, he acknowledged no other deity but the world; and few philosophers have explained the system of Pantheism more in detail, and with greater spirit and energy, than he has done in his second book.--The Natural Hittory was Pliny's last work, for he perished the year after its publication. The particulars of his death are given in a letter of the younger Pliny to the historian Tacitus, who was anxious to transmit an account of it to posterity. Tho elder Pliny was then at Misenum, in command of the fleet which was appointed to guard all that part of the Mediterranean comprehended between Italy, Gaul, Spain, and Africa. We will givo the rest of the account in the words of his nephew: "On the 24th of August, about one in the afternoon, my mother desired him to. observe a cloud which anpeared of a very unusual size and shape. He had just returned from taking the benefit of the sun, and, after bathing himself in cold water, and taking a slight repast, had retired to his study. He immediately arose and went out upon an eminence, from whence he might more distinctly view this very uncommon appearance. It was not, at that distance, discernible from what mountain this cloud issued, but it was found afterward to ascend from Vesuvius. I cannot give you a more exact description of its figure than by resembling it to that of a pine-tree, for it shot up to a great height in the form of a trunk, which extended itself at the top into a eort of branches; occasioned, I imagine, either by a sudden gust of air that impelled it, the force of which decreased as it advanced upward, or the cloud...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 796 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 40mm | 1,393g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236552466
  • 9781236552464