Civil Rights and the Presidency

Civil Rights and the Presidency : Race and Gender in American Politics, 1960-1972

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Now abridged for courses, this edition of Hugh D. Graham's groundbreaking history of national policy during the battle for civil rights recreates the intense debates in Congress and the White House that led to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 banning discrimination against minorities and women. Following the implementation of these policies through a thickening maze of federal agencies and court decisions, the text reveals how the classic liberal agenda of non-discrimination evolved into the controversial program of affirmative action, surprisingly enough, under Richard Nixon. Based on extensive, groundbreaking research in the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon presidential archives and special collections of the Library of Congress, Civil Rights and the Presidency will be invaluable for courses in American history, political science, and black and women's studies.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 288 pages
  • 157.48 x 233.68 x 17.78mm | 408.23g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • Abridged
  • Abridged ed of the civil rights era
  • 0195073223
  • 9780195073225

Review quote

Lots of ground-breaking information. Julie Leininger Pycion, Manhattan College Graham has abridged his award winning book into a highly readable account of the role of the executive branch in civil rights policy from the sit-ins of 1960 through Nixon's first administration. The Historian An extraordinarily well-written and fascinating account. Thomas A. Schwartz, Vanderbilt University A powerful critique of government civil rights policy after 1965. Florida Historical Quarterly (on the First Edition) An informative account of the crucial years in the struggle for racial minorities and women to gain more civil rights. There is much in it to stimulate class discussion. Robert W. Langran, Villanova University I am pleased to see you come out with another abridgement of a significant (if lengthy) title. William L. Van Deburg, University of Wisconsin Praise for The Civil Rights Era: Should reacquaint a new generation with forgotten truths...Instructive, too, is Mr. Graham's assessment of presidential leadership The New York Times Book Review A rigorous, undiluted examination of the policies and programs effected by the federal government in pursuit of civil equality for all citizens...An impressive marshaling of evidence and interpretation...An excellent resource Booklist The first administrative history of the movement...A major milestone in the study of recent American life and politics Library Journal A fascinating, near-definitive study of the implementation of the transcendent cause of our times...Graham does a great service in laying out the past so we can make sense of both it and the present. Review of Politics Could not be more timely...Notable for its prudent, credible insights and its calm detachment in pursuit of a subject that seems to invite little but strident advocacy and opposition, for its command of the bewildering mass of manuscript materials in federal archives and presidential libraries...and not least for its analytic clarity, its anecdotal riches, and its exhaustive exploration of a complicated and vitally important subject. Reviews in American History A gripping, literate account of landmark civil rights legislation governing employment, housing and voting. The executive branch focus is also useful both in demonstrating the fundamental role played by the White House in the enactment of these legislative reforms and in providing insightful glimpses into the Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon administrations...A highly accessible and quite worthwhile addition to the literature. Michigan Law Review Anyone interested in the 'rights revolution' of the 1960s can turn to this accessible study for an insightful analysis of national policy on race and gender in the Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon administrations. Georgia Historical Quarterlyshow more

Back cover copy

Now abridged for courses, Hugh D. Graham's groundbreaking history of national policy during the battle for civil rights re-creates the intense debates in Congress and the White House that led to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 banning discrimination against minorities and women. Unique in its discussion of both race and gender as the driving forces in the development of civil rights policy, the text follows the implementation of these policies through a thickening maze of federal agencies and court decisions, showing how the classic liberal agenda of non-discrimination evolved into the controversial program of affirmative action.show more

Table of contents

1. America in 1960: Blacks and Women on the Eve of Social Revolution ; 2. The Kennedy Presidency and Black Civil Rights, 1960-1962 ; 3. The Segregated Civil Rights Bills of 1963 for Women and Blacks ; 4. Lyndon Johnson and The Civil Rights Act of 1964 ; 5. The Watershed of 1965: From the Voting Rights Act to "Black Power" ; 6. The EEOC and the Politics of Gender ; 7. Race, Affirmative Action, and Open Housing, 1965-1968 ; 8. The Nixon Presidency: Domestic Policy and Divided Government ; 9. The Philadelphia Plan and the Politics of Minority Preference ; 10. The "Color-Blind" Constitution and the Federal Courts ; 11. Women, the Nixon Administration, and the Equal Rights Amendment ; 12. The Consolidation of 1972 ; 13. The Rights Revolution and The American Administrative State ; Further Reading ; Glossary of Organizations ; Endnotesshow more

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