A Circumstantial Report of the Evidence and Proceedings Upon the Charges Preferred Against His Royal Highness the Duke of York in the Capacity of Co

A Circumstantial Report of the Evidence and Proceedings Upon the Charges Preferred Against His Royal Highness the Duke of York in the Capacity of Co

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1809 edition. Excerpt: ...in Chief ever speak to yon upon the subject of Major Shaw, except when you, in the course of your nfiiri.il duty, made representations to the Commander in Chief respecting M-ijor Shaw? A. I do not recollect that he ever did, but I beg leave locate, that it is pressing my recollection a little hard, considering that there arc eleven or twctve thousand ofliren of tbe army, all of whom, or tlieir friend, either correspond witli or address me. Q. Did you ever hear of Mrs. Clarke's selling, or pretending to sell commissions in the army, before it became the subject of discussion io this House? A. Never, but through the medium of the numerous libels that have been lately published against the Commander in Chief. Q. Rid you ever set on foot any inquiry into the truth of those statements? A. I have already stated to the House, that in the autumn of 1804 I had understood that numerous abuses of this kind existed, and 1 did set on foot every inquiry that it was possible for me to do; I ascertained that these abuses were practised, and in a letter that is now before the House, cautioned the officers of the army against such practices; even subsequent to that letter, I had proof that suchabuscs '.lid exist, and I obtained the opinion of eminent counsel, and they assured me it was not even a misdemeanor, and that I could have no redress; upon that I represented the circumstance to the then Secretary at War, as I have already I believe stated in eri dence to this House, and a clause was inserted in the Mutiny Act, to impose a fine upon it. Q. From what source did yon receive your intelligence of the existence of those abuses? A. I rather think that the source was anonymous; but upon inquiry I found that the account was true, and I traced it to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 298 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 16mm | 535g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236623584
  • 9781236623584