Circuit Synthesis with VHDL

Circuit Synthesis with VHDL

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Description

One of the main applications of VHDL is the synthesis of electronic circuits. Circuit Synthesis with VHDL is an introduction to the use of VHDL logic (RTL) synthesis tools in circuit design. The modeling styles proposed are independent of specific market tools and focus on constructs widely recognized as synthesizable by synthesis tools.
A statement of the prerequisites for synthesis is followed by a short introduction to the VHDL concepts used in synthesis. Circuit Synthesis with VHDL presents two possible approaches to synthesis: the first starts with VHDL features and derives hardware counterparts; the second starts from a given hardware component and derives several description styles. The book also describes how to introduce the synthesis design cycle into existing design methodologies and the standard synthesis environment.
Circuit Synthesis with VHDL concludes with a case study providing a realistic example of the design flow from behavioral description down to the synthesized level.
Circuit Synthesis with VHDL is essential reading for all students, researchers, design engineers and managers working with VHDL in a synthesis environment.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 221 pages
  • 157.48 x 233.68 x 20.32mm | 453.59g
  • Dordrecht, Netherlands
  • English
  • 1994 ed.
  • XVIII, 221 p.
  • 0792394291
  • 9780792394297

Table of contents

1. ABOUT SYNTHESIS.- 1.1. Why VHDL?.- 1.2. VHDL for Which Purpose'?.- 1.3. Is VHDL a Good Language for Synthesise.- 1.4. A Book, an Outline.- 1.5. Synthesis Domain.- 1.6. Interests of Synthesis.- 1.7. Architectural Synthesis Versus Logic Synthesis.- 1.7.1. Technologies of Logic and Architectural Synthesis.- 1.7.2. Implications on Design Methodology.- 1.8. Consistency Between Simulation and Synthesis.- 2. VHDL CONCEPTS.- 2.1. Philosophy of the Language.- 2.1.1. Generality.- 2.1.2. Time.- 2.1.3. Modularity.- 2.1.4. Portability.- 2.2. Hardware Hierarchy.- 2.2.1. Entity/Architecture.- 2.2.2. Direct Instantiation of Entity.- 2.2.3. Notion of Component.- 2.2.4. Component Declaration.- 2.2.5. Component Instantiation.- 2.2.6. Component Configuration.- 2.2.7. Concurrent Procedure Call.- 2.3. Software Hierarchy.- 2.3.1. Writing Software.- 2.3.2. Packages.- 2.3.3. Subprograms.- 2.4. Objects of the Language.- 2.4.1. Constants.- 2.4.2. Variables.- 2.4.3. Signal.- 2.4.4. Files.- 2.5. Information Representation.- 2.5.1. Types of Objects.- 2.5.2. Scalar Types.- 2.5.3. Composite Types.- 2.5.4. Object Classes.- 2.6. Concurrency.- 2.6.1. Informal Definition.- 2.6.2. Signals and Ports.- 2.6.3. Resolution Function.- 2.6.4. Process.- 2.6.5. Other Concurrent Statements.- 2.6.6. Guarded Blocks.- 2.7. Sequential Domain.- 2.8. Attached Characteristics.- 2.9. Predefined Environment.- 2.9.1. Predefined Environment of the Language Itself.- 2.9.2. Standard Environment.- 2.9.3. "Proprietary" Environment.- 3. MAPPING VHDL TO HARDWARE.- 3.1. Synthesis Modeling Style.- 3.2. VHDL Types.- 3.2.1. Supported Type Declarations.- 3.2.2. Predefined Types.- 3 2 3 IEEE Strongly Recommended Types.- 3.2.4. Unsupported Types.- 3.2.5. Subtypes.- 3.3. VHDL Objects.- 3.3.1. Constants.- 3.3.2. Variables Versus Signals.- 3.3.3. Initial Values.- 3.3.4. Arithmetic Operators.- 3.4. Sequential Statements.- 3.4.1. Variable Assignment.- 3.4.2. Signal Assignment.- 3.4.3. Synchronization Statement.- 3.4.4. Conditional Statement.- 3.4.5. Iterative Statement.- 3.4.6. Subprogram Call.- 3.5. Concurrent Statements.- 3.5.1. Process and Synchronization Statement.- 3.5.2. Signal Assignment.- 3.5.3. Component Instantiation.- 3.5.4. Block Statement.- 3.5.5. Concurrent Procedure Call.- 3.5.6. Generate Statement.- 3.6. Using Generics.- 3.7. Conclusion.- 4. MAPPING HARDWARE TO VHDL.- 4.1. Combinational Circuits.- 4.1.1. Logic Gates.- 4.1.2. Comparators.- 4.1.3. Arithmetic Operations.- 4.1.4. Shift and Rotate Operations.- 4.1.5. Multiplexers.- 4.1.6. ALU.- 4.1.7. Three-State Logic.- 4.1.8. ROM.- 4.1.9. PLA.- 4.2. Synchronous Circuits.- 4.2.1. Latches.- 4.2.2. Registers.- 4.2.3. Synchronous Counters.- 4.2.4. Memories.- 4.2.5. Finite State Machines.- 5. DESIGN METHODOLOGY.- 5.1. Synthesis Design Cycle.- 5.1.1. Design Cycle Steps.- 5.1.2. Modeling for Synthesis.- 5.1.3. Synthesis Process.- 5.1.4. Final Validation.- 5.2. Synthesis Process Control.- 5.2.1. What Is Synthesis Process Control?.- 5.2.2. Design Constraints.- 5.2.3. Interface Formats.- 6. SYNTHESIS STANDARD ENVIRONMENT.- 6.1. Principle.- 6.2. Package STD_LOGIC_1164.- 6.2.1. Logic Type Interpretation: Simulation Semantics.- 6.2.2. Description of Package STD_LOGIC_1164.- 6.3. Synthesis Working Group Results.- 6.3.1. Logic Type Interpretation: Synthesis Semantics.- 6.3.2. Arithmetic Packages.- 6.3.3. Special Identifications.- 7. CASE STUDY.- 7.1. Traffic Light Controller: Once Again?.- 7.2. Specification of the Problem.- 7.3. Entity Declaration.- 7.4. Describing the Behavioral Architecture.- 7.5. Describing the Synthesizable Architecture.- 7.5.1. From Behavioral To Synthesizable Description.- 7.5.2. First Proposition of Synthesizable Architecture.- 7.5.3 Second Proposition of Synthetizable Architecture.- 7.6. Designer's Concerns.- 7.6.1. Tool Dependency.- 7.6.2. Constraint Checking.- 8. APPENDIX.- 8.1. Grammar Summary.- 8.2. Memo.- 8.2.1. Process: Is Inferred Hardware Combinational or Sequential?.- 8.2.2. Combinational Circuits: Logic Gates.- 8.2.3. Combinational Circuits: Multiplexers.- 8.2.4. Combinational Circuits: Three-State Operators.- 8.2.5. Sequential Circuits: Latch and Register.- 8.2.6. Sequential Circuits: Counter with Reset.- 8.2.7. Sequential Circuits: Finite State Machine.- 8.3 Index.
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