The Churches of the Federal Council; Their History, Organization and Distinctive Characteristics, and a Statement of the Federal Counsil

The Churches of the Federal Council; Their History, Organization and Distinctive Characteristics, and a Statement of the Federal Counsil

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ...and it was not long before a pastor came to them from the Netherlands, and a church organization was effected in 1628; this may not have been the first Protestant church in this Western world, but it certainly was the first church of the Presbyterian order. The first minister was the Rev. Jonas Michaelius, who was sent out by the Classis of Amsterdam under the auspices and at the expense of the West India Company. As the colony grew, churches were established in Brooklyn and other parts of Long Island, as well as along the Hudson River and in New Jersey; until at the time of the surrender of New Amsterdam, in 1664, there were eleven churches and seven ministers in the province. With the coming in of the English there was begun a determined attempt to establish the Episcopal Church as the official Church of New York. No stone was left unturned to bring this about; but the Dutch had refused to surrender till their religious liberties had been guaranteed; and although they were much opposed by the English governors, they maintained their rights and extended their Church as opportunity offered. In the further development of their church life the Dutch people had many obstacles to overcome, and their growth was not rapid. One difficulty was the peculiar relation which the Church sustained, on the one hand, to the Classis of Amsterdam, and on the other to the West India Company; for nearly a century and a half they had no ecclesiastical independence; this handicapped them in the matter of church extension, and in the exercise of discipline, but was a special drawback in connection with the supply of ministers for the new churches, as they were established; no minister could receive a license except from the Classis of Amsterdam; the expenditure...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 80 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 159g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123675901X
  • 9781236759016