Church and State in Yugoslavia since 1945

Church and State in Yugoslavia since 1945

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Description

This full-length study of the relations between Church and state in communist regime is set in the only communist country where free research into the subject has ever been possible; it gains additional interest and topicality from the identification of religion and nationalism in a multi-national state. The author writes objectively about the still controversial events of the war and the period immediately after, when the Catholic and Orthodox Churches were confronted by a vicious communist power, determined to impose unity on the country and break the power of the churches. She describes the harsh early years, the gradual easing of the conflict and the growth of toleration on both sides, leading to a characteristically Yugoslav form of uneasy coexistence. The legal status of the churches, the religious press and religious education are all covered and there is a special study of the well-known case of Archbishop Stepinac of Zagreb, his trial and the effect of his imprisonment.show more

Product details

  • Electronic book text
  • CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Cambridge University Press (Virtual Publishing)
  • Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • 1139106392
  • 9781139106399

Table of contents

1. Wartime: the fateful events: The background - Serbia - Croatia - Slovenia - The Partisans; Part I. The Catholic Church: 2. The immediate postwar years; 3. The trial of Archbishop Stepinac; 4. The struggle between the church and the state, 1946-1953; Part II. The Serbian Orthodox Church: 5. Liberation and its sequel; 6. The struggle to hold the church together; Part III. The Legislative Framework: 7. The constitution and the laws; Part IV. The Catholic Church: 8. The change: why and how it took place; Part V. The Serbian and Macedonian Orthodox Churches: 9. Schisms and accommodations.show more