The Chronicle of Henry of Huntingdon; Comprising the History of England, from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Accession of Henry II. Also, the AC

The Chronicle of Henry of Huntingdon; Comprising the History of England, from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Accession of Henry II. Also, the AC

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1853 edition. Excerpt: ...added that " it would only be a bed-room in proportion to the palace which ho intended to build." 4 The Saxon Chronicle calls him the king's chaplain, who held his courts (gemot) over all England. The administration of the law was now and for a long period in the hands of ecclesiastics. One of the bishops was generally the king's chancellor or justiciary. This Ranulf appears to have been a sort of judge in eyre or of circuit, and a very corrupt one. Ingram quotes a curious notice of him from the Chronicle of Peterborough, published by Sparke, typis Bowyer, 1723, which informs us that he wrote a book (now lost), "on The Laws Of England." Ingram says, "He may therefore be safely called the father of English lawyers, or at least law-writers. It was probably the foundation of the later works of Bracton, Fleta, Fortescue, and others." rather, his perverter of justice, the instrument of his exactions, which exhausted all England. This year also died Osmond, hishop of Salisbury. In the year of our Lord 1100, in the thirteenth year of his reign, King William's cruel life was brought to an end by an unhappy death. For after holding his court in great splendour, according to the custom of his predecessors, at Gloucester during Christmas, at Winchester during Easter, and during Whitsuntide at London, he went to hunt in the New Forest on the morrow of the kalends the 2nd of August. While he was hunting, Walter Tyrrel unintentionally shot the king with an arrow aimed at a stag. The king, who was pierced through the heart, fell dead without uttering a word. A short time before, blood had been seen to spring from the ground in Berkshire. The king was rightly cut off in the midst of his injustice. For he was savage beyond all men;...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 198 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 363g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236575229
  • 9781236575227