Christmas Carols, Ancient and Modern; Including the Most Popular in the West of England, and the Airs to Which They Are Sung. Also Specimens of French

Christmas Carols, Ancient and Modern; Including the Most Popular in the West of England, and the Airs to Which They Are Sung. Also Specimens of French

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1833 edition. Excerpt: ... of the year, also frequently contained songs incidental to the performances, which, as before stated, were at first subjects taken from the Scriptures. The term carol appears originally to have signified songs intermingled with dancing, or a sort of divertisement; and it is used in that sense in " Le Roman de la Rose," and by Chaucer and other old writers. It was afterwards applied to festive songs, and as these became most prevalent during Christmas, it has for a long time past designated (though not exclusively) those sung during that feast; but these should in strictness be distinguished from Christmas hymns, which are of a more solemn nature, although they are now generally conJbunded together under the name of carols. In one of the Coventry pageants, being that of the Shearmen and Tailors, towards the beginning Royal MSS. Caligula, A. xiv. of the 15th century, three songs are introduced, sufficiently rude in their construction, which from the subjoined specimens may be considered in the nature of carols; and several other examples of ancient ones will be found in the following collection. SONG I.--By the Shepherds.) As I out rode this endenes-night, Of thre ioli sheppardes I saw a sight, And all a bowte there fold a star shone bright; They sange terli terlow. So mereli the sheppards ther pipes can blow. SONG II.--(By the Women.) Lully lulla, " littell tine child, By by, lully lullay, >w littell tyne" child, By by, lully lullay. O sisters too, how may we do For to preserve )' day This pore yongling for whom we do singe By by, lully lullay. Herod the king, in his raging, Chargid he hath this day His men of might in his owne sight All yonge children to slay. That wo is me, pore child, for thee, And ever morne and say, For...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 70 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236582616
  • 9781236582614