The Christian Orator; Delivered on Public Occasions Before Religious Benevolent Societies. to Which Is Prefixed and Abridgment of Walker's Elements of

The Christian Orator; Delivered on Public Occasions Before Religious Benevolent Societies. to Which Is Prefixed and Abridgment of Walker's Elements of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1818 edition. Excerpt: ...to be abolished at last, why ought it not now? Why is injustice suffered to remain for a single hour? 3. From what I hear without doors, it is evident that there is a general conviction entertained of its being far from just, and from that very conviction of its injustice, some men have been led, I fear, to the supposition, that the Slave Trade never could have been permitted to begin, but from some strong and irresistible necessity; a necessity, however, which, if it was fancied to exist at first, I have shown cannot be thought by any man whatever to exist now. 4. This plea of necessity, thus presumed, and presumed, as I suspect, from the circumstance of injustice itself, has caused a sort of acquiescence in the continuance of this evil. Men have been led to place it among the rank of those necessary evils, which are supposed to be the lot of human creatures, and to be permitted to fall upon some countries or individuals, rather than upon others, by that Being, whose ways are inscrutable to us, and whose dispensations, it is conceived, we ought not to look into. ' Mr. Dundas, now lord Melville; Mr. Addington, now lord Sidrnouth 5. The origin of evil is indeed a subject beyond the 'reach of human understandings; and the permission of it by the Supreme Being, is a subject into which it belongs not to us to inquire. But where the evil in question is a moral evil, which a man can scrutinize, and where that moral evil has its origin-with ourselves, let us not imagine that we can clear our consciences by this general, not to say irreligious and impious way of laying aside the question. 6. If we reflect at all on this subject, we must see that every' necessary evil supposes that some other and greater evil would be incurred were it...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 70 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236758099
  • 9781236758095