The Christian Library, Second Series; Comrising the Following Standard Works in Religious Literature Together with Critical Notices of Many Other Work

The Christian Library, Second Series; Comrising the Following Standard Works in Religious Literature Together with Critical Notices of Many Other Work

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 edition. Excerpt: ... same offender, after sentence has finally gone forth, is prevented from escaping his danger. By those who recollect the opinion of the ancient Jews as to the seat of the rational faculties, to "harden the heart" is readily understood to be nothing else than to confuse the understanding. But surely, when a criminal is reserved for exemplary publishment, it matters little, so far as the individual is concerned, whether the fetters be on his body or his mind; whether he be detained in the captivity of an earthly dungeon, or in the labyrinth of prejudice and foolish hope; whether repentance be rendered vain and escape impossible by the pressure of external circumstances; or whether the yet more awful spectacle be displayed, of rendering the sinner his own executioner, and of depriving (as God is said to do, not only by Jewish, but by heathen moralists) those miserable persons of their natural prudence, whom for their crimes he purposes to destroy. The hardening, then, of Pharaoh's heart may be ascribed (as Moses, doubtless, does ascribe it) to an immediate and particular interposition of Providence, without any even the smallest imputation on the goodness and wisdom of the Most High. Secondly, I will not insist, (as, neverthess, it were easy for me to do, ) that the distinction supposed in the minor pro position between general and particular providence, when applied to a Being by whom not only the principles of his laws, but the detail of their consequences is known, is altogether futile and unphilosophical. For, Thirdly, Though we should admit, (which has not as yet been proved, ) that the moral evil which exists in the world takes its rise from God's appointment; and though we should also admit that its particular instances flow from some...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 864 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 43mm | 1,510g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236508319
  • 9781236508317