Christian Doctrine and Morals Viewed in Their Connexion; Being the Twenty-Fourth Fernley Lecture Delivered in Carrs Lane Chapel, Birmingham, July 27, 1894

Christian Doctrine and Morals Viewed in Their Connexion; Being the Twenty-Fourth Fernley Lecture Delivered in Carrs Lane Chapel, Birmingham, July 27, 1894

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ...of redemption by Jesus Christ, --the ethics of the cross. The Christian moralist may say with as good right as the theologian and the evangelist, "God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, through which the world hath been crucified to me, and I unto the world!" To that cause the apostle Paul referred the transformation of his life and character, his changed view of the world and his changed relations to it; and from the same source has proceeded the ethical regeneration to which everything hopeful and progressive in our civilization appears, directly or indirectly, to be due. Man, we have assumed, is essentially the child of God. It was from heathen poets that St Paul quoted his maxim, "We are his offspring." We were made in the eternal Father's image, made for fellowship, with the Son of his love, made for the occupation of his Spirit. Formed for these divine ends, to miss them is our ruin. To want the Spirit of God for the vitalizing and controlling element-within our being, is to want the principle of inward health, vigour, order, joy, and beauty. Hence the diseases with which individual character and society are rife. Moral evil thus regarded, and realized in its true import as an aberration from God, is sin. When the conscience is thoroughly awakened, its remorse naturally takes this form; and the man, whatever wrong he has done to himself or to society, cries out to his Maker, "Against Thee, Thee only, have I sinned, and done this evil in thy sight." Sin is rebellion, sin is sacrilege. It is disorder committed against the nature of things, against the law of the universe, which expresses the holy will and nature of almighty God. And its end is according to its works: ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 80 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 159g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123677972X
  • 9781236779724