Chrestomatheia Tes Anglikes Glosses; Ek Ton Ariston Anglon Pezographon Kai Poieton, Meta Scholion Grammatikon, Historikon Kai Geographikon, Kai Meta Epitomu Lexiku Ton En to Keimeno Lexeon

Chrestomatheia Tes Anglikes Glosses; Ek Ton Ariston Anglon Pezographon Kai Poieton, Meta Scholion Grammatikon, Historikon Kai Geographikon, Kai Meta Epitomu Lexiku Ton En to Keimeno Lexeon

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1864 edition. Excerpt: ...allows goods to be landed on the quays, without the assistance of boats; and it has been observed, that in many places the largest vessels may rest their prows against the houses, while their sterns are floating in the water. From the mouth of the Lycus to that of the harbour this arm of the Bosphorus is more than seven miles in length. The entrance is about five hundred yards broad, and a strong chain could be occasionally drawn across it, to guard the port and city from the attack of a hostile navy. We are at present qualified to view the advantageous position of Constantinople, which appears to have been formed by nature, for the centre and capital of a great monarchy. Situated in the forty-first degree of latitude, the imperial city commands, from her seven hills, the opposite shores of Europe and Asia; the climate was healthy and temperate, the soil fertile, the harbour secure and capacious; and the approach, on the side of the continent, was of small extent and easy defence. The Bosphorus and the Hellespont may be considered as the two gates of Constantinople; and the prince, who possessed those important passages, could always shut them against a naval enemy, and open them to the fleets oi commerce. ' i - The preservation of the eastern provinces may, in some degree, be ascribed to the policy of Constantine; asvthe barbarians of the Euxine, who, in the preceding age, had poured their armaments into the heart of the Mediterranean, soon desisted from the exercise of piracy, and despaired of forcing this insurmountable barrier. When the gates of the Hellespont and Bosphorus were shut, the capital still enjoyed, within their spacious en-: closure, every production which could supply the wants or gratify the luxury of its numerous...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 60 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236616685
  • 9781236616685