China and the Roman Orient; Researches Into Their Ancient and Mediaeval Relations as Represented in Old Chinese Records

China and the Roman Orient; Researches Into Their Ancient and Mediaeval Relations as Represented in Old Chinese Records

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1885 edition. Excerpt: ...of commercial pioneers, travelling on behalf of a wealthy guild in Antioch or Alexandria, than the letter of credence issued by a monarch like Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, who--from what we may conclude from the various passages occurring in classical authors with regard to the Seres--cared about as little for his colleague in Chang-an-fu as the latter cared for him. After the difficulties experienced in his wars with the Parthians, the Roman Caesar could not dream of ever penetrating to such a distance with his legions, nor would it have served Roman interests to seek an alliance with China against Parthia, as the Chinese under Huan-ti were scarcely able to keep their western frontier in order, not to speak of the Hsiung-nu nation, their great and powerful enemy. The Han Annals do not say whether the direct sea-route was after that used as the main channel for trade; but we may read between the lines that it was so; for "from that time," they say, "dates the direct intercourse with this country" (E 33). Goods, I presume, then went by junk from Annam to Ceylon, the ancient Taprobane, or the coast of Malabar, whence they were transhipped to the Red Sea.1 1 For an abstract from the principal western sources on the ancient trade with China see Reinaud, Relations Politigues, etc., dc I Empire Remain avec FAsie Orientate, a. 184 seqq., and the several accounts in Yule's Caihay and the Way Thitlier. During the two Wei dynasties, te., about between the 3rd and 6th centuries A.D., another route was largely used, especially for the importation of goods from Ta-ts'in. It is stated in the Wei-shu that "there is also connection by water with the principalities of Yi-chou and Yung-ch'ang" (I 19; cf. Q 62), and in the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 80 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 159g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123694299X
  • 9781236942999