The Childhood of Art; Or, the Ascent of Man a Sketch of the Vicissitudes of His Upward Struggle, Based Chiefly on the Relics of His Artistic Work in Prehistoric Times, by

The Childhood of Art; Or, the Ascent of Man a Sketch of the Vicissitudes of His Upward Struggle, Based Chiefly on the Relics of His Artistic Work in Prehistoric Times, by

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ...or chisels or other cutting implements. Yet they had been civilised long enough for the decoration on their pottery to become so conventionalised that it is often difficult to trace the origins of their designs. Look at this cup (Fig. 201-/). Who d e f Fig. 201.--Modifications of the gazelle motive (continued); a, b, c are fragments (actual size) from the excavations near Moussian; d, e, f are about one-third of their actual size. They were found in the cemetery outside the walls of the earliest town at Susa--now seventy feet below the summit of the mound. Compare these rows of birds with those of Fig. 123. would say at first sight that the middle figure represented a gazelle? It is seen in rather less stylised form on the other cup (Fig. 201-e), and still less conventionalised on the fragment (Fig. 201-d). On the fragments (Figs. 201-a, b, c) the transition stages are fairly recognisable, but no specimens have yet been found to lead us back to its original and probably much more natural form. Into what curious designs the goat form might pass is seen on these vase fragments (Fig. 202-a, b, c). In one case the bodies become joined to give a con F1r.. 203.--Designs supposed to represent stylised birds, degenerate forms of Fig. 204. tinuous pattern; while in the other the horns join the body and form a circle propped by three legs. One might almost feel inclined to doubt that the last figure was really intended to represent a four-legged animal, but many other specimens have been found showing that the copyists were contented to give only three legs to a figure that still bore some resemblance to a quadruped. Another strange instance is seen in Fig. 203. It does not look much like a bird, but Professor Breuil believes it to be a degenerate form of.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 122 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 231g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236513347
  • 9781236513342