The Chickasaws and Choctaws; Comprising the Treaties of 1855 and 1866, the Oklahoma Bill and Many Laws of Especial Interest to Non-Citizens, Such as the Permit Law, the Licensed Trader Law, the Stock Law, the Mining Law, the Claim Law

The Chickasaws and Choctaws; Comprising the Treaties of 1855 and 1866, the Oklahoma Bill and Many Laws of Especial Interest to Non-Citizens, Such as the Permit Law, the Licensed Trader Law, the Stock Law, the Mining Law, the Claim Law

By (author) 

List price: US$15.84

Currently unavailable

We can notify you when this item is back in stock

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ...the limits of the nation; and if the federal government is not recreant or dilatory in the performance of its duty, as defined by solemn treaty compact, it must eject violaters of the permit law from the nation as intruders. Aside from the legality of the permit law, it is but just that the non-citizens respect it. Five dollars is a very fair tax, for the privilege of a years residence in this country. Fair-minded, law-abiding citizens of the United States who have made their homes in the Indians country, will pay this permit tax as they would pay a tax on personal property in the states. This is the course most conducive to security and peace, and it is right. DISFRANCHISED CITIZENS_ In accordance with the 38th article of the treaty of 1866, many white men married members of the Chickasaw tribe and have begun by amalgamation the only practical solution of the great Indian problem. Before the emigration from Mississippi, few whites had intermarried with the Chickasaws, most of those being traders and adventurers. Since that time hundreds of American citizens had gained citizenship in the Chickasaw Nation by marriage. The blending of the two races created a new era in Chickasaw alfairs. The white citizens and the mixed-bloods naturally constituted the progressive elements of the tribe_ it is they who have brou ht about, in a great measure, the agricultural development of the coun ry. Naturally, as these classes grew in number, infiuence and wealth. there was astruggle for political supremacy between them and the full-blood element, who werejealous of the paler race that was rapidly supplanting them. The intermarried citizens and mixed-bloods, with a few of the more intelligent full-bloods, constituted the political organization known as...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236760298
  • 9781236760296