The Chess Openings; With Diagrams of Notable Positions and Problems, Considered Critically and Practically

The Chess Openings; With Diagrams of Notable Positions and Problems, Considered Critically and Practically

By (author) 

List price: US$14.14

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ... judgment to be pronounced on "its merits. No. 90 CHESS MASTERPIECES. KOLISCH. HlRSCHFELD. WHITE. BLA' K. 13 Q. to Q. B. 3. 13 K. takes B. 14 P. to K. 5. 14 K. to B.?q. 15 R. to K. sq. 15 Q. to Q. B. sq. 16 P. to Q. 5. 16 B. to K. B. 4. 17 Q. to Q. 2. Kt. to K. U. 3. 18 Q. to K. B. 4. 18 Kt. to K. Kt. 5 19 P. to K. 6. 19 B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 20 K. to K. sq. 20 B. lakes R.f 21 Q. takes B. (ch.) 21 Kt. to K. B. 3. 22 Kt. to K. 4. 22 K. to K. 2. 23 B. to K. Kt. 5.' 23 Q. to K. B. 24 R. takes B. 24 R. to K. 25 R. to Q. B. 20 K. to Q. 26 Kt. 10 K. 5. 26 P. tnki-s Kt. 27 P. to Q. 6. 27 Kt. to Q. B. 8. 28 R. takes Kt. or V. takes R Macdonnell. WHITE. 1 P. toK.4. 2 Kt, to K. B. 3. 3 B. to B. 4. 4 P. to Q. Kt. 4. 5 P. to Q. B. 3. 6 Castles. 7 P. to Q. 4. 8 P. takes p. 9 B. to Q. Kt.5. 10 B. takes Kt. 11 Kt. to Q..B. 3. 12 Q. B. to K. 3. 13 Q, Kt, to K, 2. 14 Q. to Kt, 3. 15 Q. toB. 2. 16 P. takes B. 17 Kt. to Kt. 3. 18 K. to R. sq. 19 Kt. to K. 2. 20 Kt. to K. Kt. 21 P. to K. B. 4. 22 P. takes P. 23 P. t- K. B. 3. 24 Q. to Kt. 3. 25 Q. takfs Kt. 26 Q. to Q. B. 3. 27 Kt. to K. 2. 28 P. to K. B. 5. 29 Kt. to K. B. 4. 30 Q. R. to Q. sq. 31 Kt. to Q. 5. 32 Kt. takes Q. B. P. 33 Ki. to Q. 5. 34 R. to K. Kt. sq. 85 Q. R. to K. sq. 36 R. to K. Kt, 4. 87 Kt. to Q. B. 7. 38 Kt. to K. 6. 89 P. takes R. 40 P. to K. B. 4. E Arising From B, To Q. R. 4. DR. ZlTKERTORT VARIATIONS. In the following game and its two accompanying variations, Black is represented to have the advantage in each case. No line of.play is submitted by which White, the first player, can secure even an equal game, if therefore this defence is as strong as here represented, it appears to us to strike at the root of the Evans attack. In the opening remarks of Mr. Staunton, Ik; says: ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 24 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 64g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236626265
  • 9781236626264