The Chemistry and Practice of Finishing; A Practical Treatise on the Bleaching & Finishing of Cotton Goods for Whites, Dyes, and Prints

The Chemistry and Practice of Finishing; A Practical Treatise on the Bleaching & Finishing of Cotton Goods for Whites, Dyes, and Prints

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...a bath containing silicate of soda, or tungstate of soda and chloride of ammonium. The material is then dried, and afterwards "finished" as required. SUBSTANCES USED FOR MAKING CLOTH WATERPROOF. This is a subject of little importance in the "finishing" of whites, dyes, and prints, and the authors propose simply to give a summary of the substances employed for the purpose. The following are the chief substances used: --India rubber, the various waxes, and resins, and acetate of alumina. INDIA-RUBBER.--This substance, in the form of a solution, is employed in the manufacture of the cloth known as mackintosh. It renders the fabric perfectly waterproof, but makes a very hot and uncomfortable garment to wear. THE WAXES.--These substances have been lately used for waterproofing cotton cloth. The principal waxes employed for the purpose are, Japan wax, Carnauba wax, and paraffin wax. They are generally employed for waterproofing closely woven fabrics, rendering them waterproof, not so much by giving a coating to the fabric, as in the case of mackintosh, as by filling up the cell of the fibres with a substance through which water cannot penetrate. The waxes are usually dissolved in either petroleum spirit, carbon bi-sulphide, or benzene. In all cases the greatest care is required in handling the solvents as they are most inflammable, and the vapour, when mixed with air, is explosive in contact with a naked light. In some fabrics, which the authors have examined, as much as four per cent. of the total weight has been wax. ACETATE OF ALUMINA.-This substance is largely used for rendering woollen goods waterproof. It is generally made by dissolving four ounces of alum in half a gallon of water, and mixing this with half a gallon of a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 118 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236497538
  • 9781236497536