The Chemical Gazette, Or, Journal of Practical Chemistry, in All Its Applications to Pharmacy, Arts and Manufactures Volume 9

The Chemical Gazette, Or, Journal of Practical Chemistry, in All Its Applications to Pharmacy, Arts and Manufactures Volume 9

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 edition. Excerpt: ...form imides and aniles, whilst the monobasic acids do not furnish these compounds, we find that the bibasic citraconic and mesaconic acids yield an imide and an anile, whilst itaconic acid gives no such compound. Citraconic acid, mixed with an excess of ammonia and evaporated to dryness in the water-bath, yields a mixture of neutral and acid ammonia salt; the pure acid salt is not so well adapted for the production of the imide as this mixture. When this is gradually heated in a retort, a large amount of ammoniacal water is at first given off. As soon as the temperature approaches 356, the yellowish liquid puffs up considerably, the production of water ceases, and the whole solidifies to a vitreous amber-coloured mass, which cannot be heated further without being entirely decomposed, becoming black and fusing. This mass is citraconimide. It has a conchoidal fracture, is insoluble in cold, soluble in boiling water, when the excess of substance melts to a tenacious liquid, while the dissolved portion separates on cooling in small drops, which subsequently solidify. Citraconimide dissolves somewhat in alcohol with the same phaenomena. It is tenacious, and is difficult to pulverize. The fine powder is perfectly white. In this state it is very hygroscopic, and can no longer be freed from adherent water at 212. It is inodorous. The analysis of the substance, dried at 356, at which temperature it parts with its water, furnished--Carbon 54-18 10 = 60 S4'05 Hydrogen 4-66 5 5 4-51 Oxygen 28-57 4 32 28-83 Nitrogen 12-59 1 14 12-61 Citraconimide boiled with ammonia dissolves in it, and does not separate on cooling; undoubtedly citraconaminic acid is formed. The baryta salt of this acid is soluble in water, and is precipitated from it by alcohol in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 222 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 404g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123666826X
  • 9781236668264