The Chemical Gazette, Or, Journal of Practical Chemistry, in All Its Applications to Pharmacy, Arts and Manufactures Volume 4

The Chemical Gazette, Or, Journal of Practical Chemistry, in All Its Applications to Pharmacy, Arts and Manufactures Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1846 edition. Excerpt: ...acid, which have a strong affinity for selenium, as is the case with silver, and, according to recent experiments, in a still higher degree with copper. Lead, bismuth and antimony, act far more slowly and less powerfully. If selenium were alone eliminated by zinc and iron, we should have to admit that with these metals merely the elective affinity of the oxides to the acid was active, according to which they become oxidized at the expense of a portion; but Berzelius has found in the selenium reduced by iron some seleniuret of iron, and this may probably be the case likewise with that obtained by means of zinc. The presence of another acid favours the reduction, partly from its dissolving the insoluble sele-nite which is formed, and partly because it possesses a stronger affinity to the produced oxide than the selenious acid, and consequently combines with it. In this last case, the whole of the seleuious acid can be reduced. That this favourable effect will depend both on the nature of the foreign acid and of the reducing metal is self-evident. This is perhaps the reason why Berzelius still enumerates the selenium as an idioelectrical substance with the metals. The action which these metals exert on the green solution of the selenium in sulphuric acid is highly remarkable, as they become almost immediately coated with the seleniuret which is formed; this is especially the case with silver and copper. A copper wire placed in the solution very soon forms a crust of seleniuret of copper and selenite of copper, so thick that it can be drawn off in the form of a tube from the undissolved copper wire; likewise those metals which do not reduce the selenious acid, such as gold, platinum and palladium, exhibit a strong affinity to selenium. When a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 236 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 426g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236668286
  • 9781236668288