The Chemical Gazette, Or, Journal of Practical Chemistry, in All Its Applications to Pharmacy, Arts and Manufactures Volume 2

The Chemical Gazette, Or, Journal of Practical Chemistry, in All Its Applications to Pharmacy, Arts and Manufactures Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1844 edition. Excerpt: ...of bittern, with its equivalent quantity of hydrate of lime, or of the mixed hydrates of lime and magnesia, obtained by completely burning magnesian limestone, and slaking it as above. When I use this solution of bicarbonate of magnesia for the purpose of preparing magnesia and its salts, I evaporate it to dryness, by which a pure carbonate of magnesia is at once obtained, without the necessity of using a carbonated alkali, as in the old process; and from this I prepare pure magnesia by calcination in the usual manner; or, instead of boiling to dryness, I merely heat the solution for some time to the boiling point, by which the excess of carbonic acid is partly driven off, and pure carbonate of magnesia is precipitated, which may then be collected, and dried in the same way as if precipitated by a carbonated alkali. If I require sulphate of magnesia, I neutralize the solution of bicarbonate of magnesia with sulphuric acid, boil down and crystallize; or I mix the solution with its equivalent quantity of sulphate of iron, dissolved in water, heated to the boiling point, and then suffer the precipitated carbonate of iron to subside; after which I decant the clear solution of sulphate of magnesia, boil down, and crystallize as before. When using this solution of bicarbonate of magnesia for the purpose of preparing carbonate of lead, I make a saturated solution of chloride of lead in water, which, at the temperature of 50 or 60 Fahr., has a specific gravity of about 1O08, and consists of 1 part of chloride of lead dissolved in 126 parts of water. I then mix the two solutions together, when carbonate of lead is immediately precipitated; but in this operation I find it necessary to use certain precautions, otherwise a considerable quantity of chloride...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 254 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 458g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236667816
  • 9781236667816