The Chemical Gazette, Or, Journal of Practical Chemistry, in All Its Applications to Pharmacy, Arts and Manufactures Volume 10

The Chemical Gazette, Or, Journal of Practical Chemistry, in All Its Applications to Pharmacy, Arts and Manufactures Volume 10

By (author) 

List price: US$30.24

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...same result, that is, the conversion of the iron into protosulphuret in its progress through the furnace. The flux not having lost the whole of its carbonic acid, does not possess sufficient affinity for the sulphur to decompose the protosulphuret of iron which is constantly being formed. It is only in the neighbourhood of the tuyeres, when the flux has been entirely changed into caustic lime and partially into calcium, that the affinity of the carbon in a nascent state (graphite), together with that of the lime for the sulphur, determines the decomposition of a part of the protosulphuret of iron. There is then formed sulphuret of carbon at the expense of the carbon of the cast iron, and caloric thereby rendered latent. Another portion of the sulphur combines with the calcium. The sulphuret of carbon formed in the crucible itself must be again partially burnt by the blast, from which would result sulphurous and carbonic acids, which would reproduce some sulphuret of iron and calcium, and oxide of carbon; and it should be remarked here, that the proportion of sulphuret of calcium will be the more considerable the greater the amount of lime present in the charge. It follows from this, that in order to obtain a metal which shall contain the minimum amount of sulphur, it is necessary that the slags should contain the maximum amount of lime. I may also add, that in this case the working of the furnace should be as hot as possible, in order to facilitate the isolation of the graphite, and consequently the formation of the sulphuret of carbon, which serves to transfer the sulphur from the metal to the slag. The author observes, in conclusion, that a considerable improvement has recently been effected in the working of the blast-furnaces and their...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 220 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 399g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236671600
  • 9781236671608