Chemical Analysis of Oils, Fats, Waxes and of the Commercial Products Derived Therefrom; Founded on Benedikt's Second Ed. of 'Analyse Der Fette, '

Chemical Analysis of Oils, Fats, Waxes and of the Commercial Products Derived Therefrom; Founded on Benedikt's Second Ed. of 'Analyse Der Fette, '

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ...with hemp seed oil (and Lallemantia oil). This used to happen regularly until recently in the case of Black Sea linseed oil, as the growers had been in the habit of mixing hemp seed with the linseed. Hemp seed oil is used as a paint oil, though less frequently in this country than on the Continent, where considerable quantities are also employed for making soft soaps, characterised by a dark green colour. Although not drying so quickly as linseed oil (cp. chap. ix. p. 287), it is used in the manufacture of varnishes. WALNUT 0IL--NUT OIL French--I1uile de noiz. German--Nussoel, Walla-russoel. For tables of constants see p. 351. This oil is obtained from the seeds of the common walnut-tree, Juglans regia. The fruit intended for the preparation of the oil must be allowed to ripen fully and be kept two to three months before being pressed, as the fresh seeds yield a very turbid oil, difficult to clarify. The cold-drawn oil is very fluid, almost colourless, or of a pale yellowish-green tint, and has a pleasant smell and an agreeable nutty taste; the hot-pressed oil has a greenish tint and an acrid taste and smell. One part of walnut oil dissolves in 188 parts of cold, or in about 60 parts of boiling alcohol. On cooling, crystals separate from the solution. The solid glycerides of walnut oil contain myristic and lauric acids; the liquid fatty acids of the oil consist chiefly of linolic acid, and of smaller quantities of oleic, linolenic, and isolinolenic acids. Walnut oil is a very good drying oil, and at least equal, if not superior in that respect to linseed oil (cp. chap. ix. p. 287). Its greater cost acts as incentive to its adulteration with linseed oil. The latter is detected by an iodine value higher than the normal one. Presence of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 244 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 440g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236977645
  • 9781236977649