Cheese

Cheese : Chemistry, Physics and Microbiology

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Description

Cheese: Chemistry, Physics and Microbiology, Fourth Edition, provides a comprehensive overview of the chemical, biochemical, microbiological, and physico-chemical aspects of cheese, taking the reader from rennet and acid coagulation of milk, to the role of cheese and related foods in addressing public health issues.

The work addresses the science from the basic definition of cheese, to the diverse factors that affect the quality of cheese. Understanding these fermented milk-based food products is vital to a global audience, with the market for cheese continuing to increase even as new nutritional options are explored.

Additional focus is provided on the specific aspects of the ten major variety cheese families as defined by the characteristic features of their ripening. The book provides over 1000 varieties of this globally popular food.
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Product details

  • Mixed media product | 1302 pages
  • 216 x 276 x 116.84mm | 4,340g
  • Academic Press Inc
  • San Diego, United States
  • English
  • 4th edition
  • 0124170129
  • 9780124170124

Table of contents

Section 1. Introduction Section 2. Coagulation of Milk Section 3. Starters and Manufacture Section 4. Cheese Ripening Section 5. Public Health Aspects Section 6. Cheese Technology Section 7. Diversity of Cheese
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About Paul McSweeney

Paul McSweeney is Professor of Food Chemistry in the Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College, Cork, Ireland (UCC). He graduated with a BSc (Hons) in Food Science and Technology in 1990 and a PhD in Food Chemistry from UCC in 1993 and also has an MA in Ancient Classics and a Post-Graduate Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (2012). He spent seven months (Jan-Aug, 2014) as interim head of the College of Science, Engineering and Food Science in UCC. He worked for a year in the University of Wisconsin (1991-2) as part of PhD and as a post-doctoral research scientist in UCC (1993-4). He was appointed to the academic staff of UCC in 1995. Prof McSweeney is an experienced lecturer and researcher and has successfully managed research projects funded through the Food Industry Research Measure and its predecessors administered by the Irish Department of Agriculture and Food, the EU Framework programs, the US-Ireland Co-operative Program in Agriculture/Food Science and Technology, Bioresearch Ireland and industry. He was awarded the Marschall Danisco International Dairy Science Award of the American Dairy Science Association in 2004 and in 2009 a higher doctorate (DSc) on published work by the National University of Ireland. Dr. Patrick Fox is Emeritus Professor of Food Chemistry at University College, Cork, Ireland. Prof. Fox's research has focused on the biochemistry of cheese, the heat stability of milk, physico-chemical properties of milk proteins and food enzymology. He has authored or co-authored about 450 research and review papers, authored or edited 25 text-books on Dairy Chemistry and was one of the founding editors of the International Dairy Journal. In recognition of his work, Prof Fox has received the Research & Innovation Award of the (Irish) National Board for Science and Technology (1983), the Miles-Marschall Award of the American Dairy Science Association (1987), Medal of Honour, University of Helsinki (1991), the DSc degree of the National University of Ireland (1993), the Senior Medal for Agricultural & Food Chemistry of the Royal Society for Chemistry (2000), the ISI Highly Cited Award in Agricultural Science (2002) and the International Dairy Federation Award for 2002. Prof Fox has been invited to lecture in various countries around the world, and has served in various capacities with the International Dairy Federation, including President of Commission F (Science, Nutrition and Education) from 1980 to 1983. Dr Paul Cotter is Principal Research Officer at Teagasc Food Research Centre at Teagasc, Moorepark, Fermoy, Ireland. He is a molecular microbiologist, with researchers in his lab focusing particularly on antimicrobial peptides and the microbiology of the gut (and its role in health and disease) and of food. Dr Cotter also manages the Teagasc DNA sequencing facility, is a Principal Investigator within the Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre and is an adjunct lecturer at Cork Institute of Technology. Dr Cotter's Vision I laboratory was awarded the title of Irish Food/Agriculture Laboratory of the Year 2013, he has received awards from the Society for Applied Microbiology, ESCMID and FEMS and is an appointed faculty member of Faculty of 1000 (Biology) since 2006. Dr Cotter is also the author of >130 peer-reviewed publications resulting from research funded by the EU, Science Foundation Ireland, the Irish Health Research Board, Enterprise Ireland, the Irish Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and the Irish Research Council for Science Engineering and Technology. He is also a member of the editorial boards of Applied & Environmental Microbiology, PLoS One, BMC Microbiology, F1000 Reports and Proteins & Antimicrobial Dr. Everett is an Associate Professor in the Animal Science Department and Director of the Dairy Products Technology Center. He is originally from Australia, and completed his PhD in Food Science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His academic career includes a post-doctoral fellowship at the University Of Guelph, Canada, investigating emulsion surface structures, and as faculty at the University of Melbourne, Australia, and the University of Otago, New Zealand, in food science departments. He has worked on dairy industry projects at a federal government research center on Australia (CSIRO) to help develop a technology to manufacture hard cheese from ultra-filtered milk, and at a dairy industry-funded company as a science liaison manager to bring together publicly-funded researchers with the dairy industry to solve technical problems.
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