The Chautauquan; A Weekly Newsmagazine. [Official Publication of Chautauqua Institution, a System of Popular Education] Volume 64

The Chautauquan; A Weekly Newsmagazine. [Official Publication of Chautauqua Institution, a System of Popular Education] Volume 64

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 edition. Excerpt: ...constant friction over boundaries between the various republics, are the principal reasons why the peoples of South America would never consent to submit their destinies to a common governmental control. BIBLIOGRAPHY The South American Republics, $1.35 net; $1.60 net--part leather. By Thomas C. Dawson, 2 vols. Spanish-America. By Julian Hawthorne. The History of South America, $3.00 net. Translated from the Spanish by Adnah D. Jones. The Independence of South American Republics, $2.00 net. By Frederick L. Paxson. EAT in the form of steam has been and still is the greatest factor in the development of all lines of industry which require more power than is available from human labor. Practically all the power employed by the civilized world is supplied by the steam engine--it has freed the galley slave from his labors at the oars, it has relieved the horse from the work of drawing the street car, in short it has made possible all our modern methods of productioh and transportation. Before the railway train, no one thought of that great industry, the express business, which, starting in 1839, grew in two decades in importance represented by a capital of over thirty millions and which today with a capital of over seventy millions operates on over 200,000 miles of steam and electric railroads. The steam engine has made possible the subway car, the elevated train, and the electric light, for, contrary to a rather popular impression, electricity is not a source of power. The electrical machine, called the dynamo or generator, does not go of itself, it must be driven by a steam engine, gasoline engine, water wheel, or some other prime mover. Electricity is but a medium for transmission, as is a belt, or gears, or shafting. In Boston, alone, over...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 114 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 218g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236856457
  • 9781236856456