Characteristics, Political, Philosophical, and Religious, from the Writings of Henry Edward Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster, Arranged by W.S. Lilly

Characteristics, Political, Philosophical, and Religious, from the Writings of Henry Edward Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster, Arranged by W.S. Lilly

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1885 edition. Excerpt: ...classes--is such, that they seem to me to be blind or infatuated. There are at this time even young women who habitually drink as much as would intoxicate a man; God only knows the lives of misery and the deaths of stupor or of madness to which they are advancing. Now there was a time when they had never so much as tasted Intoxicating drink. There was a time when, with a certain fear, a shrinking, a consciousness of doing a wrong or doubtful act, they began to taste, and then to drink, at first sparingly, then freely, until gradually growing confident and bold, and the temptation acquiring a great fascination, and the taste being vitiated, a craving has been excited, and the delusion of a fancied need has come upon them. They have gone on little by little, so insensibly that they have not become aware, until a bondage has been created which, unless God by an almost miraculous grace shall set them free, they will never break. What I have given in those two examples of a habit insensibly formed I might give in everything else. It applies equally to anger, jealousy, prodigality, or profuseness. Saint Augustine said, speaking of himself in his youth, while he was in habits of sin, that they bound him like a fetter. He says: 'I was bound by a chain which I had made for myself. No other man made it. I was bound mea ferrea voluntate, by the chain of my own iron will.' What but this is eternal death? What is the eternal loss of God? It is the final state of a soul which has lost its hold on God here by its own wilful acts. Bound in 'ropes of darkness, ' as Saint Peter says, when the time of grace is over, and the day of probation is gone down, and judgment is passed, the soul that has deprived itself of God in this world is cast out of the sight...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 88 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236909011
  • 9781236909015