Chapman's Homeric Hymns and Other Homerica
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Chapman's Homeric Hymns and Other Homerica

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Description

George Chapman's translations of Homer--immortalized by Keats's sonnet-- are the most famous in the English language. Swinburne praised their "romantic and sometimes barbaric grandeur," their "freshness, strength, and inextinguishable fire." And the great critic George Saintsbury wrote, "For more than two centuries they were the resort of all who, unable to read Greek, wished to know what the Greek was. Chapman is far nearer Homer than any modern translator in any modern language." This volume presents the original text of Chapman's translation of the Homeric hymns. The hymns, believed to have been written not by Homer himself but by followers who emulated his style, are poems written to the gods and goddesses of the ancient Greek pantheon. The collection, originally titled by Chapman "The Crowne of all Homers Workes," also includes epigrams and poems attributed to Homer and known as "The Lesser Homerica," as well as his famous "The Battle of Frogs and Mice."
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Product details

  • Paperback | 240 pages
  • 140 x 216 x 17.78mm | 312g
  • New Jersey, United States
  • English
  • Revised
  • Revised edition
  • 0691136769
  • 9780691136769
  • 1,159,669

Back cover copy

"It should be very satisfying to sing hymns to gods whom everyone can agree exist, so tune up your pipes for Apollo, the archer and fair king of days, or for Venus, the soft skinned, because both beauty and sunshine deserve our adoration. How appropriate that the voice you can choose here should be Elizabethan, queen of the Enlightenment, and patron of the poets, George Chapman so much among them, who made the old world new, and heard the voice of heroes in all of Homer's songs."--William H. Gass

"Chapman's versions inspired English poets for centuries after his time. They rest on a minute and perceptive reading of the texts. And they retain their power to fascinate and provoke anyone interested in Homer and his afterlife, in Renaissance ideas about classical and modern poetry, or in the development of the language of English poetry."--Anthony T. Grafton, Princeton University

"Oft of one wide expanse had I been told
That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne;
Yet did I never breathe its pure serene
Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold"--John Keats, "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer"
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Table of contents

The Homeric Hymns and George Chapman's Translation by Stephen Scully 1 Editor's Introduction by Allardyce Nicoll 41 The Crowne of all Homers Workes To the Earle of Somerset 49 The Occasion of this Impos'd Crowne 54 AL THE HYMNES OF HOMER An Hymne to Apollo 57 A Hymne to Hermes 83 A Hymne to Venus 114 To the Same 130 Bacchus, or The Pyrats 132 To Mars 136 To Diana 137 To Venus 137 To Pallas 138 To Juno 138 To Ceres 139 To the Mother of the Gods 139 To Lyon-Hearted Hercules 140 To Aesculapius 140 To Castor and Pollux 141 To Mercurie 141 To Pan 142 To Vulcan 144 To Phoebus 145 To Neptune 145 To Jove 146 To Vesta 146 To the Muses and Apollo 146 To Bacchus 147 To Diana 148 To Pallas 149 To Vesta and Mercurie 150 To Earth the Mother of All 151 To the Sun 152 To the Moone 153 To Castor and Pollux 154 To Men of Hospitalitie 155 BATRACHOMYOMACHIA 157 CERTAINE EPIGRAMMS AND OTHER POEMS OF HOMER To Cuma 177 In His Returne, to Cuma 177 Upon the Sepulcher of Midus 177 Cuma, Refusing His Offer t'Eternise Their State 178 An Assaie of His Begunne Iliads 179 To Thestor's Sonne 179 To Neptune 180 To the Cittie Erythraea 180 To Mariners 180 The Pine 181 To Glaucus 181 Against the Samian Ministresse or Nunne 182 Written on the Counsaile Chamber 182 The Fornace, Call'd in to Sing by Potters 182 Eiresione, or The Olive Branch 184 To Certaine Fisher-Boyes Pleasing Him with Ingenious Riddles 185 [Final Verses] 186 Textual Notes 191 Commentary 205 Glossary 213
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Review quote

"Oft of one wide expanse had I been toldThat deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne;Yet did I never breathe its pure sereneTill I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold"--John Keats, "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer" "Chapman's versions inspired English poets for centuries after his time. They rest on a minute and perceptive reading of the texts. And they retain their power to fascinate and provoke anyone interested in Homer and his afterlife, in Renaissance ideas about classical and modern poetry, or in the development of the language of English poetry."--Anthony T. Grafton, Princeton University "It should be very satisfying to sing hymns to gods whom everyone can agree exist, so tune up your pipes for Apollo, the archer and fair king of days, or for Venus, the soft skinned, because both beauty and sunshine deserve our adoration. How appropriate that the voice you can choose here should be Elizabethan, queen of the Enlightenment, and patron of the poets, George Chapman so much among them, who made the old world new, and heard the voice of heroes in all of Homer's songs."--William H. Gass
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About Homer

Stephen Scully is associate professor of classical studies at Boston University.
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Rating details

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