The Centennial History of the United States; From the Discovery of the American Continent to the Close of the First Century of American Independence

The Centennial History of the United States; From the Discovery of the American Continent to the Close of the First Century of American Independence

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1874 edition. Excerpt: ...part in the battle, he withdrew to Prospect Hill, where he began to fortify his position. The British made no effort to pursue him, but contented themselves with occupying Breed's and Bunker Hills. In this battle the Americans lost four hundred and fifty men, killed, wounded, and prisoners. The British, but of a force of less than three thousand, lost one thousand and fifty-four, including eighty-three officers, thirteen of whom were killed. Among the killed was Major Pitcairn, who had ordered his men to fire on the patriots at Lexington. The victory was dearly bought by the British. In its moral effects the battle was worth as much to the Americans as a success. It taught them that undisciplined provincials could hold their ground against the king's regulars, and inspired them with a confidence in their own ability to maintain the struggle. They had held their ground against twice their number, and were driven from it only when their ammunition failed. General Gage was deeply impressed with this lesson, and made no attempt to assume the offensive. When the news of the battle reached England the ministers were greatly dissatisfied with their victory. Gage was recalled, and General Howe was appointed his successor. - Washington, who had started on his journey to New England before the arrival of the news of the battle, was met on the way by the courier who bore the tidings to Congress. He hastened his journey and reached Cambridge on the 2d of July. The next day he formally assumed the command of the army. He was received with an enthusiasm which was most gratifying to him, and at once set to work to place the army in a proper condition for the service required of it. He was fully aware of the magnitude of the task he had undertaken, and his...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 350 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 19mm | 626g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236531213
  • 9781236531216