Centenary Orations, Addresses, and Poems, Commemorative of the One Hundreth Anniversary of Our National Independence; Delivered in the Several States, from Bunker Hill to Yorktown Volume 25

Centenary Orations, Addresses, and Poems, Commemorative of the One Hundreth Anniversary of Our National Independence; Delivered in the Several States, from Bunker Hill to Yorktown Volume 25

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ...then that when the ordeal came the conduct of Rhode Island was prompt and decisive? It is said that small States are always plucky ones, and Rhode Island confirmed the historic truth. It:0 w The passage of the stamp act (Feb. 27, 1765), roused the spirit of resistence through America to fever heat. But amid all the acts of Assemblies, and the resolutions of town meetings, none went so far or spoke so boldly the intentions of the people as those passed in Providence at a special town meeting (August 7, 1765), and adopted unanimously by the General Assembly (Sept 16). They pointed directly to an absolution of allegiance to the British crown, unless the grievances were removed. The day before the fatal one on which the act was to take efl'ect, the Governors of all the Colonies, but one, took the oath to sustain it. Samuel Ward, " the Governor of Rhode Island stood alone in his patriotic refusal," says Bancroft. Nor was it the last as it was not the first time that Rhode Island stood alone in the van of progress. Nonimportation arguments were everywhere made. The repeal of the odious act (Feb. 22, 1766) came too late, coupled as it was with a declaratory act asserting the right of Parliament " to bind the Colonies in all cases." Then came a new development of patriotic fervor instituted by the women of Providence. Eighteen young ladies of leading families of the town met at the house of Dr. Ephraim Bowen (March 4, 1766), and from sunrise till night, employed the time in spining flax. These " Daughters of Liberty," as they were called, resolved to use no more British goods, and to be consistent they omitted tea, from the evening meal. So rapid was the growth of the association that their next meeting was...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 334 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 18mm | 599g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236884744
  • 9781236884749