The Cause of Ireland and Its Relation the the League of Nations

The Cause of Ireland and Its Relation the the League of Nations : Statement by Hon. W. Bourke Cockran, Before the Committee of Foreign Relations of the United States Senate, Saturday, August 30, 1919 (Classic Reprint)

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Excerpt from The Cause of Ireland and Its Relation the the League of Nations: Statement by Hon. W. Bourke Cockran, Before the Committee of Foreign Relations of the United States Senate, Saturday, August 30, 1919 At this time while prosperity was returning apace, and prospects brightening steadily, the British Government undertook to pass a measure of home rule, encouraged doubtless by the excellent use which the Irish people had been making of their land. This measure did not in fact provide for home rule at all. The body it proposed to create was not a parliament but a commission to propose measures for the English Parliament. Certain subjects were rele gated to this new body, but the power of the English Parliament over it was supreme - so complete that not merely was the right reserved to set aside any act which the Irish Parliament might pass, but where that Parliament had acted on a subject entirely within its jurisdiction the British Parliament was free to pass a different act, and this act of the Imperial Body was to prevail as the supreme law of the land. Here surely was a measure which the most radical English opponent of Irish home rule could well have afforded to accept. Though it did not establish an Irish Government in any sense of the word, yet the Irish representatives who then appeared to speak for the majority of the people accepted it. And there was every reason to believe that its enactment might effect a complete settlement of this difficulty which for centuries had disturbed the peace of mankind. But a number of Ulsterites, encouraged by leading politicians of England - openly by all the Tories and secretly by many of the so-called Liberals - resolved to resist by arms the establishment of anything resembling a government in Ireland even though the limitations of its powers reduced it to little more than a shadow or simula crum of government. These men were among the most prominent of the community. They organized regiments, paraded them in public reviews, and audaciously imported stands of, arms to be employed against the British Government if it undertook to enforce a home-rule act. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 1mm | 50g
  • Forgotten Books
  • United States
  • English
  • , black & white illustrations
  • 0243259689
  • 9780243259687