The Cattle of Great Britain; Being a Series of Articles on the Various Breeds of Cattle of the United Kingdom, the History, Management, &C

The Cattle of Great Britain; Being a Series of Articles on the Various Breeds of Cattle of the United Kingdom, the History, Management, &C

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ... name Mr. William Coakes, of Charleton Court, Kingsbridge, as a highly successful breeder.--Ed. Notwithstanding his curly hair, the skin of a Devon must be mellow and elastic. Experience shows that some animals fatten faster than others. On "handling" them, we find the skin and parts beneath soft and "mellow." This "mellowness" is a kind of softness or elasticity perceived upon pressing the skin with the fingers, and is a favourable sign of the aptitude of an animal to fatten. These parts are the cellular membranes, which in fat animals are full of fat, and the possession of this mellow feeling by store stock denotes that there are plenty of membranous cells ready for the reception of fat. None have been more thoroughly successful than the Devon breeders in attaining this desirable object; they consider an animal of little value if it cannot be fattened without very extraordinary food. The general form of a Devon is very graceful, and exhibits a refined organisation of animal qualities unsurpassed by any breed. The expression of the face is gentle and intelligent; the head small, with a broad, indented forehead, tapering considerably towards the nostrils; the nose of a creamy white; the eye bright and prominent, encircled by an orange-coloured ring; the jaws clean, and free from flesh; the ears thin. The horns of the female are long and spreading, gracefully turned upwards, and tapering off towards the ends. The general aspect of the head should in many points resemble that of the deer. The horns of the bull are thicker set and more highly curved, in some instances standing out nearly square, with only a slight inclination upwards. Red is the true Devon colour, which varies from a dark to a lighter, or almost to a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 82 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236608674
  • 9781236608673