Cathedral Antiquities; Historical and Descriptive Accounts, with 311 Illustrations of the Following English Cathedrals Volume 5

Cathedral Antiquities; Historical and Descriptive Accounts, with 311 Illustrations of the Following English Cathedrals Volume 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 edition. Excerpt: ...to the eastern chantry-chapel, 9, the altar of which was at 10. P, lines shewing the form of the feretory, above. Q, chantry, with altar at a, piscina at s, and ornamented arcade at T. The south aile, U, with recesses, or closets v, w, and x; z, chantry, with piscina at 2, and altar at 3; entrance to the crypt from the south transept, Y, a view of which is given in PLATE Ix. At 4, 6, 8, is modern brickwork, intended to support and strengthen the vaulting. 5, central division, having six columns on each side, and seven arches. The foundations of the modern Lady Chapel, and its two lateral monumental chantries are pointed out by figures 12, 15, and 16, the ground beneath, 13, whilst an open arch-way is shewn at 14. This fine, spacious, and interesting crypt indicates its Norman origin, by the resemblance it bears to some ancient crypts beneath churches in Normandy; and we may safely refer its design and erection to Serlo, who was advanced to this Abbey by the Anglo-Norman Monarch, William I. and who it may be supposed had witnessed the construction of some noble churches in his own country." In the same style of architecture, and most likely of coeval design, is the original part of the choir, with its ailes, triforia, and lateral chantry-chapels. 1 This recess, or dark hole, as well as one at w, and another at 1', have all been named prisons, or cells for confinement; but it is not likely that there ever were so many places of this description in one Monastery. The apartment at r was doubtless a chantry chapel, as there are remains of its altar, piscina, &c.; besides, the Abbey prison was generally part of the lodge, or dwelling of the Master of the Infirmary, who had charge of prisoners. See Fosbrooke's Brit....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 126 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236991249
  • 9781236991249